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From muddy boots to mathematics: Advancing the science of ecosystems and biodiversity

August 14, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Princeton’s vital research across the spectrum of environmental issues is today and will continue to be pivotal to solving some of humanity’s toughest problems. Our impact is built on a long, deep, broad legacy of personal commitment, intellectual leadership, perseverance…

PEI awards new Climate and Energy Challenge projects, from the natural color-scape to the right words for climate change

June 29, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Four new projects funded by the Climate and Energy Grand Challenge program will explore topics such as the environmental impact of turbulence from offshore wind turbines, the effect of climate change on the natural color-scape, the efficient production of jet…

Wild hummingbirds see a broad range of colors humans can only imagine

June 25, 2020 ・ Liz Fuller-Wright

To find food, dazzle mates, escape predators and navigate diverse terrain, birds rely on their excellent color vision. “Humans are color-blind compared to birds and many other animals,” said Mary Caswell Stoddard, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology…

Study on shorebirds suggests that when conserving species, not all land is equal

June 9, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Princeton University researchers may have solved a long-standing mystery in conservation that could influence how natural lands are designated for the preservation of endangered species. Around the world, the migratory shorebirds that are a conspicuous feature of coastal habitats are…

A burning question: Senior Maria Stahl examined the role of fire in wildlife recovery

May 15, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

“The sky above the flames was littered not only with ash, but also with huge flutters of butterflies and clouds of grasshoppers escaping the blaze. Every now and then a stray oribi or kudu darted out from the grassland to…

Senior Cole Morokhovich’s unexpected path to studying what hummingbirds could tell us about climate change

May 7, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Princeton senior Cole Morokhovich still marvels at the possibility that his academic path may have come down to one five-minute window. Having come to Princeton with a focus on pre-medicine, he had taken most of the required courses and declared…

Levine receives prestigious Robert MacArthur ecological research award

April 17, 2020 ・ Liz Fuller-Wright

Jonathan Levine, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology (EEB) and an associated faculty member in the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI), is the 2020 recipient of the Ecological Society of America’s Robert H. MacArthur Award, the most prestigious mid-career accolade from…

‘Defend the progress you’ve made’: Addressing the urgency, hope of conservation

February 18, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

“How many of you have found the content of this course depressing?” Princeton professor David Wilcove asked as he began one of the last lectures of the fall course “Conservation Biology.” After three months of examining the global decimation of…

A world without the Amazon? Safeguarding the Earth’s largest rainforest focus of Princeton conference

October 23, 2019 ・ Pooja Makhijani

The Amazon is the world’s largest and most diverse tropical forest and the ancestral home of over 1 million indigenous peoples. How to preserve it was the centrally urgent theme at a conference at Princeton on Oct. 17-18. “Safeguarding the…