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Study reveals how inland and coastal waterways influence climate

March 16, 2022

“Streams to the river, river to the sea.” If only it were that simple. Most global carbon-budgeting efforts assume a linear flow of water from the land to the sea, which ignores the complex interplay between streams, rivers, lakes, groundwater,…

Future hurricanes likely to pose much greater flood risk to U.S. East and Gulf coasts

February 3, 2022 ・ Adam Hadhazy

Extreme flooding events spawned by hurricanes are likely to become far more frequent along the Eastern and Southern U.S. coastlines because of a combination of sea-level rise and storm intensification. The findings, contained in new research from Princeton University, show…

Policy interventions could help farmers economically survive in vulnerable regions

December 1, 2021 ・ B. Rose Huber

In the grasslands of Nepal’s Chitwan Valley, local farmers rely on the production of rice and other grains to generate household income. But their livelihoods are under threat, as Nepal is experiencing the effects of climate change at a much…

Princeton, HMEI experts identify priorities for UN climate summit and global actions going forward

October 28, 2021 ・ Liz Fuller-Wright

Hundreds of leaders and thousands of climate scholars from around the globe will gather in Glasgow, Scotland, for COP26, the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, from Oct. 31 to Nov. 12. Most experts believe this year’s meeting — the biggest…

Rise and fall of water blisters offers glimpse beneath Greenland’s thick ice sheet

August 20, 2021 ・ Morgan Kelly

Water “blisters” trapped beneath the thick interior of Greenland’s ice sheet could provide critical insight into the hydrological network coursing deep below Earth’s second largest body of ice — and how it might be destabilized by climate change, according to…

Tropical birds may skip breeding when hot, dry conditions persist

July 20, 2021 ・ Liana Wait

During the past several years, ecologists have warned that prolonged periods of drought may be leading to declines in tropical bird populations by reducing reproductive success in adults. Now, Princeton researchers report that some tropical birds may not only be…

Resplandy receives NSF CAREER Award to study the formation and future of Pacific and Indian Ocean dead zones

July 8, 2021 ・ Morgan Kelly

Laure Resplandy, assistant professor of geosciences and the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI), received a five-year, $654,000 CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation to examine the complexity of factors that lead to the formation and expansion of oxygen-depleted regions,…

Simple atmospheric dynamics foretell dangerously hot future for the tropics

May 5, 2021 ・ Morgan Kelly

Extreme heat is among the most concerning and potentially deadly effects of climate change, especially for the rapidly growing and urbanizing populations living in the tropics. Yet, climate models tend to be unclear when projecting how high temperatures will climb…

Despite sea-level rise risks, migration to some threatened coastal areas may increase

February 17, 2021 ・ Keely Swan

In coming decades as coastal communities around the world are expected to encounter sea-level rise, the general expectation has been that people’s migration toward the coast will slow or reverse in many places. However, new research co-authored by Princeton University scholars…