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Tropical birds may skip breeding when hot, dry conditions persist

July 20, 2021 ・ Liana Wait

During the past several years, ecologists have warned that prolonged periods of drought may be leading to declines in tropical bird populations by reducing reproductive success in adults. Now, Princeton researchers report that some tropical birds may not only be…

Resplandy receives NSF CAREER Award to study the formation and future of Pacific and Indian Ocean dead zones

July 8, 2021 ・ Morgan Kelly

Laure Resplandy, assistant professor of geosciences and the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI), received a five-year, $654,000 CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation to examine the complexity of factors that lead to the formation and expansion of oxygen-depleted regions,…

Simple atmospheric dynamics foretell dangerously hot future for the tropics

May 5, 2021 ・ Morgan Kelly

Extreme heat is among the most concerning and potentially deadly effects of climate change, especially for the rapidly growing and urbanizing populations living in the tropics. Yet, climate models tend to be unclear when projecting how high temperatures will climb…

Despite sea-level rise risks, migration to some threatened coastal areas may increase

February 17, 2021 ・ Keely Swan

In coming decades as coastal communities around the world are expected to encounter sea-level rise, the general expectation has been that people’s migration toward the coast will slow or reverse in many places. However, new research co-authored by Princeton University scholars…

Carbon-chomping soil bacteria may pose hidden climate risk

January 27, 2021 ・ Molly Sharlach

Much of the Earth’s carbon is trapped in soil, and scientists have assumed that potential climate-warming compounds would safely stay there for centuries. But Princeton research supported by the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI) shows that carbon molecules can potentially…

Data-Driven Model Provides Projections of a 21st Century Urban Climate

January 4, 2021 ・ Lois E. Yoksoulian and B. Rose Huber

Cities occupy about only 3% of the Earth’s total land surface, but they bear the burden of the human-perceived effects of global climate change. Yet, current global climate models are set up mainly for big-picture analysis, leaving urban areas poorly…

Expansion, environmental impacts of irrigation by 2050 greatly underestimated

May 4, 2020 ・ Joseph Albanese

The amount of farmland around the world that will need to be irrigated in order to feed an estimated global population of 9 billion people by 2050 could be up to several billion acres, far higher than scientists currently project,…

Climate change could make RSV respiratory infection outbreaks less severe, more common

December 16, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

One of the first studies to examine the effect of climate change on diseases such as influenza that are transmitted directly from person to person has found that higher temperatures and increased rainfall could make outbreaks less severe but more…

Full video of Princeton Environmental Forum now available

December 5, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

Video is now available of the Oct. 24-25 Princeton Environmental Forum featuring Princeton faculty and alumni environmental leaders in a series of discussions addressing urgent environmental issues for the 21st century, including climate change science and policy, the protection of…