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Tighter border policies leave migrants vulnerable to effects of climate change

October 12, 2020 ・ B. Rose Huber

As the planet continues to warm, people living in the world’s most vulnerable regions — such as arid or low-lying nations — must contend with the decision to stay in a place where livability is decreasing, or leave for countries…

Climate change could mean fewer sunny days for hot regions banking on solar power

October 7, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

While solar power is a leading form of renewable energy, new research suggests that changes to regional climates brought on by global warming could make areas currently considered ideal for solar power production less viable in the future. Princeton-based researchers…

Socolow, Weber recount experiences ‘witnessing’ climate change in essays for Dædalus

October 6, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Princeton faculty Robert Socolow and Elke Weber are among 16 prominent climate scientists and scholars featured in the Fall 2020 issue of the journal Dædalus who provided personal narratives about their responsibility to share — and their experiences sharing —…

Largest COVID-19 contact-tracing study to date finds children key to spread, evidence of superspreaders

September 30, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

A study of more than a half-million people in India who were exposed to the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 suggests that the virus’ continued spread is driven by only a small percentage of those who become infected. Furthermore, children and young…

Princeton, PEI researchers join $1M NSF effort to model nation’s groundwater

September 28, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Researchers from Princeton will help lead a $1 million project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) that will use artificial intelligence to simulate the nation’s natural groundwater system in an effort to improve water management and help people better…

Long-term COVID-19 containment will be shaped by strength and duration of natural, vaccine-induced immunity

September 21, 2020

New research suggests that the impact of natural and vaccine-induced immunity will be key factors in shaping the future trajectory of the global coronavirus pandemic, known as COVID-19. In particular, a vaccine capable of eliciting a strong immune response could…

Connected virtually, working globally: PEI engaged more than 100 undergraduates in virtual environmental internships for summer 2020


September 9, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Princeton senior Ben Alessio had planned to spend his summer internship with the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) in the laboratory of Professor Howard Stone conducting experiments related to diffusiophoresis, an important process by which particles are transported through water. But…

Reed Maxwell, Jerry Zee join Princeton Environmental Institute faculty

September 1, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) welcomed Sept. 1 new faculty members Reed Maxwell, professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Princeton Environmental Institute, and Jerry Zee, assistant professor of anthropology and the Princeton Environmental Institute. Their appointments expand the…

From muddy boots to mathematics: Advancing the science of ecosystems and biodiversity

August 14, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Princeton’s vital research across the spectrum of environmental issues is today and will continue to be pivotal to solving some of humanity’s toughest problems. Our impact is built on a long, deep, broad legacy of personal commitment, intellectual leadership, perseverance…