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Posted by Morgan Kelly on Aug 15, 2017
Princeton University researchers have uncovered a critical role for a new immune signaling pathway in controlling infection by the flavivirus Yellow Fever Virus (YFV), according to a paper published Aug. 15 in the journal mBio. The research stemmed from a 2015 Grand Health Challenges grant from the Princeton Environmental Institute.
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Posted by Morgan Kelly on Aug 01, 2017
Researchers from Princeton University and elsewhere have found that increased precipitation due to climate change could substantially overload waterways in the United States with excess nitrogen, especially in the Midwest and Northeast. They reported July 28 in the journal Science that greater nitrogen pollution would likely worsen eutrophication, a process by which waterways become overloaded with nutrients and starved of oxygen.
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Posted by Morgan Kelly on Jul 21, 2017
Five Princeton University graduate students have been selected to receive Walbridge Fund Graduate Awards from the Princeton Environmental Institute to support their doctoral research. Established in 2009, the Walbridge Fund provides up to $10,000 to Princeton graduate students pursuing innovative projects in the fields of energy technology, carbon policy and climate science.
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Posted by Morgan Kelly on Jul 21, 2017
Eight Princeton University graduate students were selected to receive a Mary and Randall Hack ’69 Graduate Award from the Princeton Environmental Institute. The award provides up to $8,000 in research funding to Princeton graduate students exploring water and water-related topics. The 2017 recipients are Kessie Alexandre, Keita DeCarlo, Ying Liu, Hamid Omidvar, Melany Ruiz, Kimia Shahi, Kaia Tombak and Siyuan (Henry) Xian.
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Posted by Morgan Kelly on Jul 21, 2017
Princeton University graduate students Xiaogang He and Kasparas Spokas have been awarded 2017 PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellowships from the Princeton Environmental Institute. The PEI-STEP Fellowship Program provides Princeton doctoral students in departments outside of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs with two years of financial support and a $3,500 award.
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Posted by Morgan Kelly on Jul 18, 2017
Peter Grant, the Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology, Emeritus, and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, emeritus, and B. Rosemary Grant, senior research biologist, emeritus, ecology and evolutionary biology, have been named recipients of the Royal Medal in Biology.
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Posted by Pooja Makhijani for the Office of Communications on Jul 17, 2017
Could the storms that once engulfed the Great Plains in clouds of black dust in the 1930’s once again wreak havoc in the U.S.? A new statistical model developed by researchers at Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) predicts that climate change will amplify dust activity in parts of the U.S. in the latter half of the 21st century, which may lead to the increased frequency of spectacular dust storms that have far-reaching impacts on public health and infrastructure.
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Posted by Suleman Din for the Office of Engineering Communications on Jul 12, 2017
Finding an alternative vehicle fuel poses a difficult challenge: it has to be relatively cheap and able to reduce carbon emissions without using up valuable crop land or trees from forests. Now, researchers at Princeton’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment say one possible solution might be all around us. In a recent paper, the researchers evaluated a method that creates fuel from wood residues, sawdust and branches. The method, called catalytic hydropyrolysis, could use the refining and distribution systems now used for gasoline to create a fuel that would work in modern engines.
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Posted by Morgan Kelly on Jul 10, 2017
Michael Celia, the Theodora Shelton Pitney Professor of Environmental Studies and professor of civil and environmental engineering, has been named director of the Princeton Environmental Institute effective July 1. Celia, who has been involved in PEI's research, teaching programs and governance for many years, succeeds François Morel, the Albert G. Blanke, Jr., Professor of Geosciences and professor of geosciences and the Princeton Environmental Institute, who had served as director since 2014.
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Posted by Morgan Kelly on Jun 29, 2017
Unmitigated climate change could make the United States poorer and more unequal, according to a study in the journal Science that includes PEI researchers. The poorest third of counties could sustain economic damage costing as much as 20 percent of their income by the end of the century if warming proceeds unabated. States in the South and lower Midwest, which tend to be poor and hot already, will lose the most, with economic opportunity traveling northward and westward. Colder and richer counties along the northern border and in the Rockies could benefit the most as health, agriculture and energy costs are projected to improve.
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