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From muddy boots to mathematics: Advancing the science of ecosystems and biodiversity

August 14, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Princeton’s vital research across the spectrum of environmental issues is today and will continue to be pivotal to solving some of humanity’s toughest problems. Our impact is built on a long, deep, broad legacy of personal commitment, intellectual leadership, perseverance…

Study on shorebirds suggests that when conserving species, not all land is equal

June 9, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Princeton University researchers may have solved a long-standing mystery in conservation that could influence how natural lands are designated for the preservation of endangered species. Around the world, the migratory shorebirds that are a conspicuous feature of coastal habitats are…

Levine receives prestigious Robert MacArthur ecological research award

April 17, 2020 ・ Liz Fuller-Wright

Jonathan Levine, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology (EEB) and an associated faculty member in the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI), is the 2020 recipient of the Ecological Society of America’s Robert H. MacArthur Award, the most prestigious mid-career accolade from…

‘Defend the progress you’ve made’: Addressing the urgency, hope of conservation

February 18, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

“How many of you have found the content of this course depressing?” Princeton professor David Wilcove asked as he began one of the last lectures of the fall course “Conservation Biology.” After three months of examining the global decimation of…

A world without the Amazon? Safeguarding the Earth’s largest rainforest focus of Princeton conference

October 23, 2019 ・ Pooja Makhijani

The Amazon is the world’s largest and most diverse tropical forest and the ancestral home of over 1 million indigenous peoples. How to preserve it was the centrally urgent theme at a conference at Princeton on Oct. 17-18. “Safeguarding the…

Study helps pinpoint what makes species vulnerable to environmental change

October 16, 2019 ・ Joseph Albanese

The fabled use of canaries in coal mines as an early warning of carbon monoxide stemmed from the birds’ extreme sensitivity to toxic conditions compared to humans. In that vein, some avian species can indicate environmental distress brought on by…

Princeton’s ‘All for Earth’ podcast addresses environmental issues, solutions

September 12, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

The new Princeton University podcast “All for Earth” delves into the urgency of today’s environmental crises — as well as the effectiveness of the tools we already have to mitigate them — through in-depth interviews with the people leading the…

Fewer fish may reach breeding age as climate change skews timing of reproduction, food availability

July 24, 2019 ・ Joseph Albanese

Climate change may be depriving juvenile fish of their most crucial early food source by throwing off the synchronization of when microscopic plants known as phytoplankton bloom and when fish hatch, according to Princeton University researchers. The long-term effect on…

Plants and microbes shape global biomes through local underground alliances

April 17, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

Dense rainforests, maple-blanketed mountains and sweeping coniferous forests demonstrate the growth and proliferation of trees adapted to specific conditions. The regional dominance of tree species we see on the surface, however, might actually have been determined underground long ago. Princeton…