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Long-term COVID-19 containment will be shaped by strength and duration of natural, vaccine-induced immunity

September 21, 2020

New research suggests that the impact of natural and vaccine-induced immunity will be key factors in shaping the future trajectory of the global coronavirus pandemic, known as COVID-19. In particular, a vaccine capable of eliciting a strong immune response could…

Local climate unlikely to drive the early COVID-19 pandemic

May 18, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Local variations in climate are not likely to dominate the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a Princeton University study published May 18 in the journal Science. The researchers found that the vast number of people still vulnerable…

Princeton researchers map rural U.S. counties most vulnerable to COVID-19

April 15, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

A county-by-county analysis of the United States by Princeton University researchers suggests that rural counties with high populations of people over 60 and limited access to health care facilities could eventually be among the hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic…

Climate change could make RSV respiratory infection outbreaks less severe, more common

December 16, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

One of the first studies to examine the effect of climate change on diseases such as influenza that are transmitted directly from person to person has found that higher temperatures and increased rainfall could make outbreaks less severe but more…

PEI awards $1.01 million in Water and the Environment Grand Challenge projects

October 1, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

The ecological impacts of extreme weather, a national “climate park” in the New Jersey Meadowlands, and engineered nanoparticles that target groundwater pollutants are among the 13 projects funded by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) as part of its Water and…

PEI Urban Grand Challenges awards $509,000 to new urban sustainability projects

January 17, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

Vertical farms in post-industrial America, origami-based noise-pollution barriers, and cement made from burned waste make up the latest round of projects funded by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) Urban Grand Challenges program. Totaling $509,000, the new awards are active through September…

To Predict How Climate Change Will Affect Disease, Researchers Must Fuse Climate Science and Biology

September 18, 2017

To predict how climate change will affect disease, researchers need new statistical models that incorporate both climate factors and the climate-disease relationship, and account for uncertainties in both.

FACULTY AWARD: Metcalf Awarded by Wellcome Fund to Study Population, Disease Dynamics

September 16, 2015 ・ Igor Heifetz

C. Jessica Metcalf one of 10 professors chosen for a new five-year $115 million initiative to study links between human health and the health of the environment.

Ebola Outbreak of 2014 May Have Laid Tracks for Deadly Measles Epidemic in Africa

March 13, 2015 ・ Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications

The Ebola outbreak that has swept West Africa since 2014 may have cleared the way for a more familiar killer that could claim thousands of more lives — measles.