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Local climate unlikely to drive the early COVID-19 pandemic

May 18, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

Local variations in climate are not likely to dominate the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a Princeton University study published May 18 in the journal Science. The researchers found that the vast number of people still vulnerable…

COVID-19′s silent spread: How symptomless transmission helps pathogens thrive

May 14, 2020 ・ Catherine Zandonella

COVID-19′s rapid spread throughout the world has been fueled in part by the virus’ ability to be transmitted by people who are not showing symptoms of infection. Now, a study by researchers at Princeton has found that this silent phase…

Princeton researchers map rural U.S. counties most vulnerable to COVID-19

April 15, 2020 ・ Morgan Kelly

A county-by-county analysis of the United States by Princeton University researchers suggests that rural counties with high populations of people over 60 and limited access to health care facilities could eventually be among the hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic…

Climate change could make RSV respiratory infection outbreaks less severe, more common

December 16, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

One of the first studies to examine the effect of climate change on diseases such as influenza that are transmitted directly from person to person has found that higher temperatures and increased rainfall could make outbreaks less severe but more…

Antibiotic resistance in food animals nearly tripled since 2000

October 9, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

The growing appetite for animal protein in developing countries has resulted in a smorgasbord of antibiotic consumption for livestock that has nearly tripled the occurrence of antibiotic resistance in disease-causing bacteria easily transmitted from animals to humans, according to a…

surgeon and interns working on a surgery

Government subsidies could be key to containing hospital-born infections

April 3, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

Health care-associated infections — illnesses that people contract while being treated in a hospital or other health care facility — sicken millions of people each year and cost billions of dollars in additional treatment. While there has been some improvement…

Urban Population, Transportation Patterns Affect How Flu Epidemics Play Out

October 8, 2018 ・ Morgan Kelly

The more people a city has and the more organized its residents’ movement patterns, the longer its flu season is apt to last, new research co-authored by Princeton University researchers shows. Published in the journal Science, the findings are an important step toward predicting…

As antibiotics fail, global consumption of antibiotics skyrockets, further driving drug resistance

March 26, 2018

Despite the threat of a global health crisis in antibiotic resistance, worldwide use of antibiotics soared 39 percent between 2000 and 2015.

Competing for blood: How ecologists are solving infectious disease mysteries

February 12, 2018 ・ Liz Fuller-Wright

Princeton ecologists found that co-infections of malaria and hookworm center on fights over a shared resource: red blood cells.