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Climate change could make RSV respiratory infection outbreaks less severe, more common

December 16, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

One of the first studies to examine the effect of climate change on diseases such as influenza that are transmitted directly from person to person has found that higher temperatures and increased rainfall could make outbreaks less severe but more…

Government subsidies could be key to containing hospital-born infections

April 3, 2019 ・ Morgan Kelly

Health care-associated infections — illnesses that people contract while being treated in a hospital or other health care facility — sicken millions of people each year and cost billions of dollars in additional treatment. While there has been some improvement…

Urban Population, Transportation Patterns Affect How Flu Epidemics Play Out

October 8, 2018 ・ Morgan Kelly

The more people a city has and the more organized its residents’ movement patterns, the longer its flu season is apt to last, new research co-authored by Princeton University researchers shows. Published in the journal Science, the findings are an important step toward predicting…

As antibiotics fail, global consumption of antibiotics skyrockets, further driving drug resistance

March 26, 2018

Despite the threat of a global health crisis in antibiotic resistance, worldwide use of antibiotics soared 39 percent between 2000 and 2015.

Competing for blood: How ecologists are solving infectious disease mysteries

February 12, 2018 ・ Liz Fuller-Wright

Princeton ecologists found that co-infections of malaria and hookworm center on fights over a shared resource: red blood cells.

ENV 304

Undergrads exhibit semester research for “Disease Ecology, Economics and Policy”

December 19, 2017

Students in the course “Disease Ecology, Economics and Policy” gathered in the Guyot Atrium Dec. 14 to present their semester research projects on the emergence and spread of disease.

To Predict How Climate Change Will Affect Disease, Researchers Must Fuse Climate Science and Biology

September 18, 2017

To predict how climate change will affect disease, researchers need new statistical models that incorporate both climate factors and the climate-disease relationship, and account for uncertainties in both.

An immune signaling pathway for control of Yellow Fever Virus infection

August 15, 2017

Princeton researchers uncovered a critical role for a new immune signaling pathway in controlling infection by the Yellow Fever Virus (YFV).

Giant Middle East Dust Storm Caused by a Changing Climate, Not Human Conflict

January 13, 2017 ・ Matt Soniak for the Office of Engineering Communications

Researchers have determined that the massive late-summer 2015 dust storm in the Middle East was caused by a changing climate and was not attributable to the civil war in Syria, as many media outlets reported.