Cooperative Institute for Climate Science (CICS) News – Fall 2015

Joanne Curcio for PEI ・ Princeton Environmental Institute

CICS Research Shows Connections between La Niña and Ozone Air Quality in Western U.S.

A study led by CICS Scientist Meiyun Lin, an AOS associate research scholar, uses observations and numerical simulations to demonstrate a strong connection between high ozone days in the western U.S. during late spring and La Niña, an ocean-atmosphere phenomena that affects global weather patterns. This linkage is important for developing seasonal forecasts with a few months of lead time to aid in western U.S. air quality planning and for effective implementation of U.S. ozone standards. AOS faculty member Larry Horowitz is a coauthor of the study published in May in Nature Communications.

Lin and Horowitz conducted the research with Arlene Fiore, an atmospheric scientist at Columbia University; Andrew Langford, an atmospheric scientist at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado; Samuel Oltmans of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder, who works in NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory; David Tarasick of Environment Canada; and Harald Rieder of the University of Graz in Austria.

Jet stream plays role
Jet stream plays role
Particularly in spring after La Niña winters, when the polar jet stream meanders southward over the western U.S., it facilitates intrusions of stratospheric ozone to ground level where people live. (NOAA)

 

CICS-Sponsored Workshops Bring Scientific Community Together

More than sixty fisheries and climate scientists converged on Main Campus from June 3-5, 2015 to assess the utility of present seasonal to decadal climate predictions for marine resource management, and to develop new and innovative applications of these prediction systems. The CICS-sponsored “Application of Seasonal to Decadal Climate Predictions for Marine Resource Management Workshop” brought together a diverse group of scientists with a common interest in applying short-term climate predictions toward sustainable marine resource management. According to organizers, the pioneering applications presented at the workshop are cause for considerable optimism, and the workshop identified concrete steps for addressing remaining challenges.

SAS Workshop 2015 Participants
SAS Workshop 2015 Participants

 

From June 8-10, 2015, the atmospheric modeling community came together at the “Southeast Atmosphere Studies Workshop” to evaluate, diagnose, and improve climate and air quality modeling of different spatial scales for improved representation of fundamental atmospheric processes. Laboratory chemists, field observationalists, and regional and global chemistry-climate modelers presented their findings relevant to air quality and climate over the Southeast U.S. This region has experienced large increases in population and large changes in air pollutant emissions over the past decades, and has exhibited a poorly understood “warming hole” over the past century. The workshop, co-sponsored by CICS and held at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), attempted to synthesize information from the Southeast Atmosphere Studies (SAS), a field campaign to investigate biosphere-atmosphere interactions and the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere, across this wide range of perspectives in order to best inform, constrain, and evaluate processes in atmospheric chemistry models.