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Regrow, not reuse: How restoring abandoned farms can mitigate climate change

May 25, 2022 ・ B. Rose Huber

The Institute Woods near Princeton University’s campus comprises 589 acres of serene walking trails and a wooden footbridge enjoyed by hikers, runners, and birdwatchers. Like many forests in New Jersey, this local landmark was a patchwork of farm fields and…

CMI Best Paper Awards recognize work on carbon capture, irrigation’s climate impact

April 27, 2022 ・ Morgan Kelly

The Carbon Mitigation Initiative (CMI) recognized Tom Postma, a Ph.D. candidate in civil and environmental engineering, and Yujin Zeng, an associate research scholar in atmospheric and oceanic sciences, at the CMI Annual Meeting for outstanding published research. Postma was awarded…

Like a natural system, democracy faces collapse as polarization leads to loss of diversity

December 6, 2021 ・ Morgan Kelly

Much like an overexploited ecosystem, the increasingly polarized political landscape in the United States — and much of the world — is experiencing a catastrophic loss of diversity that threatens the resilience not only of democracy, but also of society, according…

Policy interventions could help farmers economically survive in vulnerable regions

December 1, 2021 ・ B. Rose Huber

In the grasslands of Nepal’s Chitwan Valley, local farmers rely on the production of rice and other grains to generate household income. But their livelihoods are under threat, as Nepal is experiencing the effects of climate change at a much…

Gone one, gone all: Without Africa’s large herbivores, a woody vine could threaten the biodiversity of savanna plant communities

September 27, 2021 ・ Liana Wait

The African savanna supports one of the world’s last intact large-mammal communities. Savannas also are home to a diverse array of plant species, but human-driven declines in animal populations could disrupt the balance of both plant and animal species in…

Rise and fall of water blisters offers glimpse beneath Greenland’s thick ice sheet

August 20, 2021 ・ Morgan Kelly

Water “blisters” trapped beneath the thick interior of Greenland’s ice sheet could provide critical insight into the hydrological network coursing deep below Earth’s second largest body of ice — and how it might be destabilized by climate change, according to…

‘Less than 1% probability’ that Earth’s energy imbalance increase occurred naturally, say Princeton and GFDL scientists

July 28, 2021 ・ Liz Fuller-Wright

Sunlight in, reflected and emitted energy out. That’s the fundamental energy balance sheet for our planet. If Earth’s clouds, oceans, ice caps and land surfaces send as much energy back up to space as the sun shines down on us,…

Walbridge Fund 2021 graduate researchers explore environmental topics from carbon capture to the social power of “sacred ecology”

July 15, 2021 ・ Morgan Kelly

The High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI) has selected 10 Princeton University graduate students as 2021 recipients of the Walbridge Fund Graduate Award for Environmental Research. The awardees are Maria Curria, Ipsita Dey, Yuki Haba, Shannon Hoffman, Xiaohan Li, Sayumi Miyano, José Montaño…

Exhaustive comparison of continental-scale hydrological models ensures better management of water resources

July 6, 2021 ・ Morgan Kelly

While Earth’s freshwater resources are finite, the challenge of effectively and sustainably managing them as we head into a warmer future with a growing human population means keeping tabs on a seemingly endless network of above- and below-ground waterways. For…