Signals, Yardsticks, and Tipping Points

 

During the 2014 fall break, 12 Princeton freshman took a trip to Bermuda to study the role of the ocean in global climate change. In this video, they share their experience.

What are the most important signals, yardsticks, and tipping points for understanding the extent and impact of global warming? How can we measure and interpret the melting of continental ice caps and glaciers, the rising level of the sea, or the fluctuations in sea temperature and acidification? And how can we use this data to begin the process of solving the carbon and climate problem? These are the questions addressed in freshman seminar “Signals, Yardsticks and Tipping Points: Global Warming and Ocean Environments” taught by Eileen Zerba in the fall of 2014.

During the course, the students studied fundamental principles of climate change, the potential risks of human-induced climate change, and the potential environmental and biological impacts of global warming. Particular emphasis was given to ocean life and systems and their connection to other environments. The course included lectures, discussions, interactive exercises, and hands-on lab and field inquiry-based exercises, including a seven-day excursion during fall break to the island of Bermuda where they were based at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science (BIOS). The island of Bermuda is located in the core of the Sargasso Sea and is surrounded by a unique marine habitat including reef-building corals that provide excellent field sites for studying the impact of a warming Gulf Stream on temperature tolerances and adaptations of ocean communities. The students prepared this video to share their learning experience.

Signals, Yardsticks, and Tipping Points

Publish Date

January 28, 2015

Video Length

00:06:53

 

During the 2014 fall break, 12 Princeton freshman took a trip to Bermuda to study the role of the ocean in global climate change. In this video, they share their experience.

What are the most important signals, yardsticks, and tipping points for understanding the extent and impact of global warming? How can we measure and interpret the melting of continental ice caps and glaciers, the rising level of the sea, or the fluctuations in sea temperature and acidification? And how can we use this data to begin the process of solving the carbon and climate problem? These are the questions addressed in freshman seminar “Signals, Yardsticks and Tipping Points: Global Warming and Ocean Environments” taught by Eileen Zerba in the fall of 2014.

During the course, the students studied fundamental principles of climate change, the potential risks of human-induced climate change, and the potential environmental and biological impacts of global warming. Particular emphasis was given to ocean life and systems and their connection to other environments. The course included lectures, discussions, interactive exercises, and hands-on lab and field inquiry-based exercises, including a seven-day excursion during fall break to the island of Bermuda where they were based at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science (BIOS). The island of Bermuda is located in the core of the Sargasso Sea and is surrounded by a unique marine habitat including reef-building corals that provide excellent field sites for studying the impact of a warming Gulf Stream on temperature tolerances and adaptations of ocean communities. The students prepared this video to share their learning experience.