PEI Faculty Seminar Series: Horses, Zebras and Asses: What Their Behavioral Ecology Reveals About Environmental Patterns, Processes and Policy

 

Fall 2017 PEI Faculty Seminar Series – 9/19/2017

Dan Rubenstein, Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology, Director of the Program in Environmental Studies

Although closely related, horses, zebras and asses have had vastly different interactions with humans, from being valued for labor and transport to being considered pests. Rubenstein will identify the unique features of each animal that explain why co-existence with people has been harder for some species than others. Those same fundamental behavioral patterns — and the ecological forces that shape them — can instruct policies that better conserve endangered equids such as mustangs and improve human interactions with wild species overall.

PEI Faculty Seminar Series: Horses, Zebras and Asses: What Their Behavioral Ecology Reveals About Environmental Patterns, Processes and Policy

Publish Date

September 19, 2017

Presenter(s)

Dan Rubenstein

Video Length

00:59:38

 

Fall 2017 PEI Faculty Seminar Series – 9/19/2017

Dan Rubenstein, Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology, Director of the Program in Environmental Studies

Although closely related, horses, zebras and asses have had vastly different interactions with humans, from being valued for labor and transport to being considered pests. Rubenstein will identify the unique features of each animal that explain why co-existence with people has been harder for some species than others. Those same fundamental behavioral patterns — and the ecological forces that shape them — can instruct policies that better conserve endangered equids such as mustangs and improve human interactions with wild species overall.