PEI Faculty Seminar: “China’s Energy Future: Potential Air-Pollution, Health and Climate Implications”

 

Denise Mauzerall, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Public and International Affairs, presented, “China’s Energy Future: Potential Air-Pollution, Health and Climate Implications,” at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 1. Bender is the fourth speaker in the Spring 2018 PEI Faculty Seminar Series.

Summary: China is the world’s largest emitter of carbon dioxide and suffers from extreme levels of air pollution that are detrimental to human health and agriculture. The Chinese government has declared a war on air pollution and is already making notable progress toward peaking carbon dioxide levels by 2030 or sooner. Mauzerall will discuss recent work in her group to quantify the co-benefits of various on-going mitigation strategies on air quality, climate and public health, including decreasing the use of coal in the residential sector, increasing the use of renewable energy, and increasing electrification of the economy. She also will describe a virtuous cycle in which decreasing air pollution levels will allow for an increase in solar-electricity generation and an associated reduction in coal use, air pollution and carbon dioxide emissions.

PEI Faculty Seminar: “China’s Energy Future: Potential Air-Pollution, Health and Climate Implications”

Publish Date

May 1, 2018

Presenter(s)

Denise Mauzerall

Video Length

00:53:05

 

Denise Mauzerall, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Public and International Affairs, presented, “China’s Energy Future: Potential Air-Pollution, Health and Climate Implications,” at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 1. Bender is the fourth speaker in the Spring 2018 PEI Faculty Seminar Series.

Summary: China is the world’s largest emitter of carbon dioxide and suffers from extreme levels of air pollution that are detrimental to human health and agriculture. The Chinese government has declared a war on air pollution and is already making notable progress toward peaking carbon dioxide levels by 2030 or sooner. Mauzerall will discuss recent work in her group to quantify the co-benefits of various on-going mitigation strategies on air quality, climate and public health, including decreasing the use of coal in the residential sector, increasing the use of renewable energy, and increasing electrification of the economy. She also will describe a virtuous cycle in which decreasing air pollution levels will allow for an increase in solar-electricity generation and an associated reduction in coal use, air pollution and carbon dioxide emissions.