ChESS Series: “Resolving Host-Microbe Conflict,” with Toby Kiers

Toby Kiers, University Research Chair and professor of evolutionary biology at the University of Amsterdam, presented, “Resolving Host-Microbe Conflict,” at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15, in Guyot Hall, Room 10. This event was the first in PEI’s Challenges in Environmental Sciences Seminar (CHESS) Series, and also part of the EEB 522 Seminar Series.

Summary: Human societies around the world are regulated by sets of overlapping rules because large-scale cooperation is fragile — an association that starts out being mutually beneficial can evolve into one that is parasitic. In nature, different species form intimate partnerships that allow them to trade services and resources. Adaptations allow individuals to discriminate among partners based on symbiotic performance and allow organisms to negotiate conditions of trade. Kiers’ lab develops tools to visualize, track and quantify symbiotic trade over space and time, and is ultimately interested in predicting how and when cooperation is favored to evolve.

 

ChESS Series: “Resolving Host-Microbe Conflict,” with Toby Kiers

Publish Date

February 15, 2018

Presenter(s)

Toby Kiers University of Amsterdam

Video Length

00:44:33

Toby Kiers, University Research Chair and professor of evolutionary biology at the University of Amsterdam, presented, “Resolving Host-Microbe Conflict,” at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15, in Guyot Hall, Room 10. This event was the first in PEI’s Challenges in Environmental Sciences Seminar (CHESS) Series, and also part of the EEB 522 Seminar Series.

Summary: Human societies around the world are regulated by sets of overlapping rules because large-scale cooperation is fragile — an association that starts out being mutually beneficial can evolve into one that is parasitic. In nature, different species form intimate partnerships that allow them to trade services and resources. Adaptations allow individuals to discriminate among partners based on symbiotic performance and allow organisms to negotiate conditions of trade. Kiers’ lab develops tools to visualize, track and quantify symbiotic trade over space and time, and is ultimately interested in predicting how and when cooperation is favored to evolve.