After The Spectacular Image-Concluding Discussion

 

Global environmental pressures solicit not only technological and policy innovations, but also social transformations. Over the past century, image making and visualization practices – in the arts, literature, and the sciences – have formed a cultural infrastructure focused on the relationship between humans, other species, and their environments. Images have, in numerous ways, impacted political and cultural debates about nature, environment, and climate.

At the same time, new challenges have emerged: given that the processes producing changes to the climate are slow and agglomerative, and resist familiar forms of representation, scholars of art, architecture, and media have explored new analytic methods and historical narratives. The cultural imaginary of the relationship between these processes and systems is thus also in transition, and can be critically evaluated for the visions of the future such representations contain.

After the Spectacular Image will bring together a group of prominent scholars to examine the rich history of representing climate and its effects.

Organized by Daniel A. Barber, Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and Humanities, Princeton Environmental Institute and School of Architecture.

Part of After the Spectacular Image: Art, Architecture, and the Media of Climate Change

Environmental Humanities Symposium co-sponsored by the Princeton School of Architecture, the Princeton-Mellon Initiative on Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities, and the Program on Media and Modernity.

Read More: http://environment.princeton.edu/events/asi

After The Spectacular Image-Concluding Discussion

Publish Date

February 11, 2016

Presenter(s)

Daniel A. Barber

Video Length

01:57:45

 

Global environmental pressures solicit not only technological and policy innovations, but also social transformations. Over the past century, image making and visualization practices – in the arts, literature, and the sciences – have formed a cultural infrastructure focused on the relationship between humans, other species, and their environments. Images have, in numerous ways, impacted political and cultural debates about nature, environment, and climate.

At the same time, new challenges have emerged: given that the processes producing changes to the climate are slow and agglomerative, and resist familiar forms of representation, scholars of art, architecture, and media have explored new analytic methods and historical narratives. The cultural imaginary of the relationship between these processes and systems is thus also in transition, and can be critically evaluated for the visions of the future such representations contain.

After the Spectacular Image will bring together a group of prominent scholars to examine the rich history of representing climate and its effects.

Organized by Daniel A. Barber, Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and Humanities, Princeton Environmental Institute and School of Architecture.

Part of After the Spectacular Image: Art, Architecture, and the Media of Climate Change

Environmental Humanities Symposium co-sponsored by the Princeton School of Architecture, the Princeton-Mellon Initiative on Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities, and the Program on Media and Modernity.

Read More: http://environment.princeton.edu/events/asi