“Theory Underwater: Diving Memoirs, Vampire Squid and Speculative Fiction”

Melody Jue, assistant professor of English at the University of California-Santa Barbara, will present “Theory Underwater: Diving Memoirs, Vampire Squid and Speculative Fiction” at noon Monday, Jan. 13, in McCormick Hall, Room 106. Jue is speaking as part of the Spring 2020 seminar series, New Directions in Environmental Humanities — this talk was organized with Princeton’s Department of English.

Jue will explore the ocean’s different perceptual conditions — increased pressure, 3D movement, visual opacity, and sound — as a science-fictional space for enhancing environmental humanities scholarship. She will draw on literature, media and her own scuba diving experiences to show how the ocean breaks the terrestrial bias scholars have taken for granted and offers storytelling strategies that can be mobilized by environmental-justice movements.

This event is free and open to the public. Additional speakers and dates in this series are:

JANUARY 7

Continent in Dust, Continent in Flux: Experiments in a Chinese Weather System
Jerry Zee, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of California-Santa Cruz

JANUARY 23

Forced Life: Female Sexual Reproduction as Panacea and Poison in the Sixth Age of Extinction
Juno Parreñas, Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, The Ohio State University

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“Theory Underwater: Diving Memoirs, Vampire Squid and Speculative Fiction”

Event Date

Mon, Jan 13, 2020 ・ 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Location

McCormick Hall, Room 106

Melody Jue, assistant professor of English at the University of California-Santa Barbara, will present “Theory Underwater: Diving Memoirs, Vampire Squid and Speculative Fiction” at noon Monday, Jan. 13, in McCormick Hall, Room 106. Jue is speaking as part of the Spring 2020 seminar series, New Directions in Environmental Humanities — this talk was organized with Princeton’s Department of English.

Jue will explore the ocean’s different perceptual conditions — increased pressure, 3D movement, visual opacity, and sound — as a science-fictional space for enhancing environmental humanities scholarship. She will draw on literature, media and her own scuba diving experiences to show how the ocean breaks the terrestrial bias scholars have taken for granted and offers storytelling strategies that can be mobilized by environmental-justice movements.

This event is free and open to the public. Additional speakers and dates in this series are:

JANUARY 7

Continent in Dust, Continent in Flux: Experiments in a Chinese Weather System
Jerry Zee, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of California-Santa Cruz

JANUARY 23

Forced Life: Female Sexual Reproduction as Panacea and Poison in the Sixth Age of Extinction
Juno Parreñas, Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, The Ohio State University