“Repatriation: A Local and Global Conversation”

The roundtable discussion, “Repatriation: A Local and Global Conversation,” will address the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) at 9 a.m. Thursday, May 9, in the Lewis Arts Complex CoLab.

The Indigenous International Repatriation Movement is advancing in countries throughout the world. In 2018, Emmanuel Macron committed to the repatriation of African objects looted during French colonization. Norway just announced the return of thousands of belongings, collected by ethnographer Thor Heyerdahl Jr., to the Rapa Nui community of Easter Island. Meanwhile, the Klahoose First Nation in British Columbia has developed an app to trace the diaspora of Indigenous belongings to museums worldwide.

Join art historian India Rael; Honor Keeler, assistant director of Utah Dine Bikeyah and NAGPRA review committee member; Curtis Zunigha, Cultural Resources Director from the Delaware Tribe of Indians; and community leaders from Utah Dine Bikeyah for a group discussion on repatriation, the history of Indigenous Ancestors and cultural items at Princeton, and the institutional ethics of return.

This event is the second of two public events being held in conjunction with the multi-site exhibition, “Public Lands, Private Hands: An Exhibition Depicting the Exploration and Exploitation of the American West,” opening Monday, May 6, in the CoLab and the Princeton University Art Museum Works on Paper Study Room. The exhibition includes photographs drawn from Princeton’s collections, works by Princeton undergraduate students, and original photographs by Fazal Sheikh, the Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities in the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI).

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“Repatriation: A Local and Global Conversation”

Event Date

Thu, May 9, 2019 ・ 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM

Location

Lewis Arts Complex CoLab; Princeton University Art Museum

body of water shaped as top half of a globe hahaha

The roundtable discussion, “Repatriation: A Local and Global Conversation,” will address the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) at 9 a.m. Thursday, May 9, in the Lewis Arts Complex CoLab.

The Indigenous International Repatriation Movement is advancing in countries throughout the world. In 2018, Emmanuel Macron committed to the repatriation of African objects looted during French colonization. Norway just announced the return of thousands of belongings, collected by ethnographer Thor Heyerdahl Jr., to the Rapa Nui community of Easter Island. Meanwhile, the Klahoose First Nation in British Columbia has developed an app to trace the diaspora of Indigenous belongings to museums worldwide.

Join art historian India Rael; Honor Keeler, assistant director of Utah Dine Bikeyah and NAGPRA review committee member; Curtis Zunigha, Cultural Resources Director from the Delaware Tribe of Indians; and community leaders from Utah Dine Bikeyah for a group discussion on repatriation, the history of Indigenous Ancestors and cultural items at Princeton, and the institutional ethics of return.

This event is the second of two public events being held in conjunction with the multi-site exhibition, “Public Lands, Private Hands: An Exhibition Depicting the Exploration and Exploitation of the American West,” opening Monday, May 6, in the CoLab and the Princeton University Art Museum Works on Paper Study Room. The exhibition includes photographs drawn from Princeton’s collections, works by Princeton undergraduate students, and original photographs by Fazal Sheikh, the Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities in the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI).