PEFF: “ANTHROPOCENE: The Human Epoch”

The film “ANTHROPOCENE: The Human Epoch” will be screened at 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 12, in the Computer Science Building, Room 104. This event is part of the April 8-14 Princeton Environmental Film Festival co-sponsored by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI).

Summary: “ANTHROPOCENE: The Human Epoch” is a cinematic meditation on humanity’s massive reengineering of the planet. Four years in the making, the documentary follows the research of an international body of scientists, the Anthropocene Working Group, who, after nearly 10 years of research, are arguing that the evidence shows the Holocene Epoch gave way to the Anthropocene Epoch in the mid-20th century, as a result of profound and lasting human changes to the Earth. The filmmakers traversed the globe to document the evidence and experience of human planetary domination, from concrete seawalls in China that now cover 60 percent of the mainland coast, to the biggest terrestrial machines ever built in Germany, to psychedelic potash mines in Russia’s Ural Mountains, to metal festivals in the closed city of Norilsk, to the devastated Great Barrier Reef in Australia and surreal lithium evaporation ponds in the Atacama desert.

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PEFF: “ANTHROPOCENE: The Human Epoch”

Event Date

Fri, Apr 12, 2019 ・ 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Location

Computer Science Building Room 104

The film “ANTHROPOCENE: The Human Epoch” will be screened at 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 12, in the Computer Science Building, Room 104. This event is part of the April 8-14 Princeton Environmental Film Festival co-sponsored by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI).

Summary: “ANTHROPOCENE: The Human Epoch” is a cinematic meditation on humanity’s massive reengineering of the planet. Four years in the making, the documentary follows the research of an international body of scientists, the Anthropocene Working Group, who, after nearly 10 years of research, are arguing that the evidence shows the Holocene Epoch gave way to the Anthropocene Epoch in the mid-20th century, as a result of profound and lasting human changes to the Earth. The filmmakers traversed the globe to document the evidence and experience of human planetary domination, from concrete seawalls in China that now cover 60 percent of the mainland coast, to the biggest terrestrial machines ever built in Germany, to psychedelic potash mines in Russia’s Ural Mountains, to metal festivals in the closed city of Norilsk, to the devastated Great Barrier Reef in Australia and surreal lithium evaporation ponds in the Atacama desert.