PECS Student-Faculty Dinner: “Bioenergy, BECCS and Double-Counting,” Tim Searchinger

Speaker: Tim Searchinger, Research Scholar, Woodrow Wilson School, Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy Program

Abstract: Although nearly all studies project expanding land-use demands for agriculture and urban areas, many studies still claim potential for bioenergy at levels that would require a quantity of biomass equal to all present human harvests of crops, residues, wood and grasses. Projections for bio-energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) are often similar. This talk, based on the paper available online, will discuss how these projections are based on forms of double-counting, explore the conditions required for benefits from BECCS, and alternatives.

Speaker Bio: Tim Searchinger is a research Scholar in the Program in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy in Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, where he focuses on strategies for increasing food supplies to meet rising demands, while decreasing greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture and land-use change. His recent work includes global modeling of the food system, emissions and land-use change, detailed projects on livestock systems in Rwanda, Colombia and Vietnam, as well as bioenergy. Among other recent work, a book-length report for the World Bank and the World Resources Institute analyzing strategies to reduce agricultural emissions to acceptable levels will be released in spring 2018.

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PECS Student-Faculty Dinner: “Bioenergy, BECCS and Double-Counting,” Tim Searchinger

Event Date

Wed, Feb 21, 2018 ・ 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Location

Prospect House Room A

Category

S.O.S. sign written in beach sand near beach waves hahaha

Speaker: Tim Searchinger, Research Scholar, Woodrow Wilson School, Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy Program

Abstract: Although nearly all studies project expanding land-use demands for agriculture and urban areas, many studies still claim potential for bioenergy at levels that would require a quantity of biomass equal to all present human harvests of crops, residues, wood and grasses. Projections for bio-energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) are often similar. This talk, based on the paper available online, will discuss how these projections are based on forms of double-counting, explore the conditions required for benefits from BECCS, and alternatives.

Speaker Bio: Tim Searchinger is a research Scholar in the Program in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy in Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, where he focuses on strategies for increasing food supplies to meet rising demands, while decreasing greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture and land-use change. His recent work includes global modeling of the food system, emissions and land-use change, detailed projects on livestock systems in Rwanda, Colombia and Vietnam, as well as bioenergy. Among other recent work, a book-length report for the World Bank and the World Resources Institute analyzing strategies to reduce agricultural emissions to acceptable levels will be released in spring 2018.