Mellon Forum: “Predatory Development and Climate Change”

Christina Jackson, associate professor of sociology at Stockton University, and HMEI/Princeton Mellon Fellow Davy Knittle will present “Predatory Development and Climate Change.”

Jackson and Knittle will discuss how Black urban communities and communities in poverty are fighting the triple threat of gentrification, unemployment and climate change through local movements that advocate for more equitable forms of renewal. Predominantly Black communities in many U.S. cities have previously borne the brunt of urban restructuring that used the language of growth to advance inequitable plans, raising the question of who benefits and who is left out of renewal and revitalization. Jackson and Knittle will talk about how contemporary calls for urban transformation are tasked with facilitating large-scale transformation that helps prepare for environmental uncertainty without repeating past violence against marginalized communities.

Register to attend in person (PUID holders only) in Betts Auditorium, School of Architecture, or via Zoom livestream (open to all). The event also will be broadcast on Princeton University – Channel 7 LIVE *.

This event is cosponsored by HMEI and is part of the fall 2021 Mellon Forum on the Urban Environment, which explores the meaning of “return” in the post-pandemic era, as well as issues of remediation for communities, societies and our environment. The series is organized by the Princeton Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism and the Humanities.

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Mellon Forum: “Predatory Development and Climate Change”

Event Date

Wed, Nov 17, 2021 ・ 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Location

Betts Auditorium/Zoom webinar

Christina Jackson, associate professor of sociology at Stockton University, and HMEI/Princeton Mellon Fellow Davy Knittle will present “Predatory Development and Climate Change.”

Jackson and Knittle will discuss how Black urban communities and communities in poverty are fighting the triple threat of gentrification, unemployment and climate change through local movements that advocate for more equitable forms of renewal. Predominantly Black communities in many U.S. cities have previously borne the brunt of urban restructuring that used the language of growth to advance inequitable plans, raising the question of who benefits and who is left out of renewal and revitalization. Jackson and Knittle will talk about how contemporary calls for urban transformation are tasked with facilitating large-scale transformation that helps prepare for environmental uncertainty without repeating past violence against marginalized communities.

Register to attend in person (PUID holders only) in Betts Auditorium, School of Architecture, or via Zoom livestream (open to all). The event also will be broadcast on Princeton University – Channel 7 LIVE *.

This event is cosponsored by HMEI and is part of the fall 2021 Mellon Forum on the Urban Environment, which explores the meaning of “return” in the post-pandemic era, as well as issues of remediation for communities, societies and our environment. The series is organized by the Princeton Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism and the Humanities.