Environmental Humanities Colloquium: “Humans as Acquired Taste”

Jacob Dlamini, an assistant professor of history at Princeton and PEI associated faculty, will present, “Humans as Acquired Taste: Thoughts on the History of an Idea,” at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, in East Pyne, Room 111.

Dlamini will discuss how the policy of killing predators that attack humans is primarily based on the assumption that humans are separate from the food chain and does not have a strong basis in animal-behavior science. “Man-eaters” are framed as deviants from the species hierarchy that acquired a taste for human flesh. Dlamini will draw upon his work in South Africa’s Kruger National Park to evaluate this and other classification regimes that govern conservation by imposing human values on natural systems.

Dlamini is the second speaker in the Fall 2019 Environmental Humanities Colloquium sponsored by PEI. Additional speakers and dates in this series are:

Sept. 25

Once Upon a Tomorrow
Meera Subramanian
Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities, Princeton University

Nov. 13

A Woman of Many Masks: Alice Sheldon as Climate-Fiction Pioneer and Anthropocene Prophet
Iain McCalman
Professor Emeritus of History, University of Sydney

Dec. 4

Salvage: Experiment, Engagement and the Environmental Humanities
Allison Carruth, Anschutz Distinguished Fellow in American Studies, Princeton University; Associate Professor of English, University of California-Los Angeles

Environmental Humanities Colloquium: “Humans as Acquired Taste”

Event Date

Wed, Oct 16, 2019 ・ 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Location

East Pyne, Room 111

Jacob Dlamini, an assistant professor of history at Princeton and PEI associated faculty, will present, “Humans as Acquired Taste: Thoughts on the History of an Idea,” at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, in East Pyne, Room 111.

Dlamini will discuss how the policy of killing predators that attack humans is primarily based on the assumption that humans are separate from the food chain and does not have a strong basis in animal-behavior science. “Man-eaters” are framed as deviants from the species hierarchy that acquired a taste for human flesh. Dlamini will draw upon his work in South Africa’s Kruger National Park to evaluate this and other classification regimes that govern conservation by imposing human values on natural systems.

Dlamini is the second speaker in the Fall 2019 Environmental Humanities Colloquium sponsored by PEI. Additional speakers and dates in this series are:

Sept. 25

Once Upon a Tomorrow
Meera Subramanian
Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities, Princeton University

Nov. 13

A Woman of Many Masks: Alice Sheldon as Climate-Fiction Pioneer and Anthropocene Prophet
Iain McCalman
Professor Emeritus of History, University of Sydney

Dec. 4

Salvage: Experiment, Engagement and the Environmental Humanities
Allison Carruth, Anschutz Distinguished Fellow in American Studies, Princeton University; Associate Professor of English, University of California-Los Angeles