Conference: “Indigenous/Settler”

Indigenous struggles for land, justice and cultural identity will be examined at “Indigenous/Settler,” a three-day conference beginning at 4:45 p.m. Thursday, April 4, and continuing though Saturday, April 6, in East Pyne Hall, Room 010. A conference schedule is available online.

Scholars and activists working in various areas of indigenous studies will discuss methods for thinking across geographies, building alliances and fighting settler colonialism at large without abandoning attention to specific histories and struggles. Just as the resistance at Standing Rock in 2016 mainstreamed expressions of global Indigenous solidarity, this conference is intended to explore and historicize — as much as carefully practice — what has been called “trans” or “pan” or “global” Indigenous studies.

The conference is free and open to the public, and sponsored by the Princeton Humanities Council’s David A. Gardner ’69 Magic Project with additional support from the Princeton University Center for Human Values, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI), and the Princeton University Art Museum.

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Conference: “Indigenous/Settler”

Event Date

Thu, Apr 4, 2019 ・ 4:45 PM - Sat, Apr 6, 2019 ・ 8:00 PM

Location

East Pyne, Room 010

S.O.S. sign written in beach sand near beach waves hahaha

Indigenous struggles for land, justice and cultural identity will be examined at “Indigenous/Settler,” a three-day conference beginning at 4:45 p.m. Thursday, April 4, and continuing though Saturday, April 6, in East Pyne Hall, Room 010. A conference schedule is available online.

Scholars and activists working in various areas of indigenous studies will discuss methods for thinking across geographies, building alliances and fighting settler colonialism at large without abandoning attention to specific histories and struggles. Just as the resistance at Standing Rock in 2016 mainstreamed expressions of global Indigenous solidarity, this conference is intended to explore and historicize — as much as carefully practice — what has been called “trans” or “pan” or “global” Indigenous studies.

The conference is free and open to the public, and sponsored by the Princeton Humanities Council’s David A. Gardner ’69 Magic Project with additional support from the Princeton University Center for Human Values, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI), and the Princeton University Art Museum.