Colloquium: “Climate, Environment and Migration in Historical Perspective”

The Princeton Climate Change and History Research Initiative (CCHRI) will host the colloquium “Climate, Environment and Migration in Historical Perspective,” which will explore the influence of environmental and climate change on human migration throughout history, starting at 9 a.m. Thursday, April 25, in the Louis A. Simpson International Building, Room 144. The event is the latest in CCHRI’s annual Colloquium at Princeton series.

Alex de Sherbinin, associate director for science applications at the Columbia University Center for International Earth Science Information Network, will deliver the keynote lecture, “Understanding the Past to Project Future Climate Change-Induced Migration: Lessons from the Groundswell Project,” at 4:30 p.m.

This event is free and open to the public and sponsored by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies with support from the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI).

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Colloquium: “Climate, Environment and Migration in Historical Perspective”

Event Date

Thu, Apr 25, 2019

Location

Louis A. Simpson Building, Room 144

S.O.S. sign written in beach sand near beach waves hahaha

The Princeton Climate Change and History Research Initiative (CCHRI) will host the colloquium “Climate, Environment and Migration in Historical Perspective,” which will explore the influence of environmental and climate change on human migration throughout history, starting at 9 a.m. Thursday, April 25, in the Louis A. Simpson International Building, Room 144. The event is the latest in CCHRI’s annual Colloquium at Princeton series.

Alex de Sherbinin, associate director for science applications at the Columbia University Center for International Earth Science Information Network, will deliver the keynote lecture, “Understanding the Past to Project Future Climate Change-Induced Migration: Lessons from the Groundswell Project,” at 4:30 p.m.

This event is free and open to the public and sponsored by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies with support from the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI).