ChESS Series: “A Universal Scaling Law for Gas Transfer Velocities Across Complex Interfaces

Gabriel Katul, Professor of Hydrology and Micrometeorology at Duke University, will present, “A Universal Scaling Law for Gas Transfer Velocities Across Complex Interfaces,” at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 1, in Maeder Hall, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. This event is the fourth in PEI’s Challenges in Environmental Sciences Seminar (CHESS) Series, and also a Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar.

Bulk mass exchange between an interface-emitting or -absorbing gas and a turbulent flow — represented by a gas transfer velocity — is commonly described as an empirical function of a mean velocity at some reference height. Such a representation, while of practical significance and continued use in large-scale climate models, misses the most important ingredient to the transfer process itself: turbulent eddies. The connection between energy content in eddies (a microscopic state) and gas transfer velocities (a macroscopic outcome) may be viewed as analogous to a fluctuation-dissipation relation, except for turbulent flows.

You can watch entire lecture on Youtube

This event is free to the public.

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ChESS Series: “A Universal Scaling Law for Gas Transfer Velocities Across Complex Interfaces

Event Date

Thu, Mar 1, 2018 ・ 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Presenter

Gabriel Katul

Location

Maeder Hall- Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

Gabriel Katul, Professor of Hydrology and Micrometeorology at Duke University, will present, “A Universal Scaling Law for Gas Transfer Velocities Across Complex Interfaces,” at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 1, in Maeder Hall, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. This event is the fourth in PEI’s Challenges in Environmental Sciences Seminar (CHESS) Series, and also a Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Seminar.

Bulk mass exchange between an interface-emitting or -absorbing gas and a turbulent flow — represented by a gas transfer velocity — is commonly described as an empirical function of a mean velocity at some reference height. Such a representation, while of practical significance and continued use in large-scale climate models, misses the most important ingredient to the transfer process itself: turbulent eddies. The connection between energy content in eddies (a microscopic state) and gas transfer velocities (a macroscopic outcome) may be viewed as analogous to a fluctuation-dissipation relation, except for turbulent flows.

You can watch entire lecture on Youtube

This event is free to the public.