Bradford Seminar: “‘We Are Not Guinea Pigs’: The Effects of Negative News on Vaccine Compliance”

Belinda Archibong, assistant professor of economics at Barnard College, Columbia University, will present “‘We Are Not Guinea Pigs’: The Effects of Negative News on Vaccine Compliance” via Zoom webinar. Register online in advance to receive a webinar link.

Archibong will discuss the potential spillover effects of perceived medical malpractice on vaccine hesitancy based on her study of the influence of negative news on vaccine compliance. In 1996, Pfizer tested a new drug on 200 children in Muslim Nigeria that resulted in 11 children dying while others were disabled. After the disclosure of these deaths in 2000, Muslim mothers reduced routine vaccination of children born in subsequent years, with the effect being stronger for educated mothers and mothers residing in minority-Muslim neighborhoods. The disclosure did not affect other health-seeking behavior in mothers.

This event is part of the David Bradford Energy and Environmental Policy Seminar Series organized by the Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment (C-PREE) in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs and co-sponsored by the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI).

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Bradford Seminar: “‘We Are Not Guinea Pigs’: The Effects of Negative News on Vaccine Compliance”

Hand wearing blue latex glove holding a filled syringe horizontally

Belinda Archibong, assistant professor of economics at Barnard College, Columbia University, will present “‘We Are Not Guinea Pigs’: The Effects of Negative News on Vaccine Compliance” via Zoom webinar. Register online in advance to receive a webinar link.

Archibong will discuss the potential spillover effects of perceived medical malpractice on vaccine hesitancy based on her study of the influence of negative news on vaccine compliance. In 1996, Pfizer tested a new drug on 200 children in Muslim Nigeria that resulted in 11 children dying while others were disabled. After the disclosure of these deaths in 2000, Muslim mothers reduced routine vaccination of children born in subsequent years, with the effect being stronger for educated mothers and mothers residing in minority-Muslim neighborhoods. The disclosure did not affect other health-seeking behavior in mothers.

This event is part of the David Bradford Energy and Environmental Policy Seminar Series organized by the Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment (C-PREE) in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs and co-sponsored by the High Meadows Environmental Institute (HMEI).