Harvin Sangha ’23

Major

Operations Research and Financial Engineering

Project Title

Community Attitudes to Large-scale Renewable Energy Deployment in Net-Zero America Scenarios

Certificate(s): Applications of Computing, Finance, Statistics and Machine Learning

I interned with the Behavioral Science for Policy Lab (BSPL) as a part of the Princeton Net-Zero America (NZA) project. Currently, NZA is a techno-economic analysis of various pathways to decarbonizing the American economy. I incorporated organization-level data to the NZA scenarios to investigate which corporate institutions are primed for net-zero transition. I collected corporate variables related to organizational structures — such as the existence of sustainability committees or energy-reduction policies — and firm characteristics, such as the average age of the board of directors or the percentage of women in management. I analyzed the impact of these organization-level variables on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the largest producers of various energies (wind, solar, oil, hydroelectric, etc.) in 11 representative states. I learned new technical skills such as using R software, the Bloomberg Terminal, and basic data analysis. From environmental, social and governance metrics, to GHG-emissions scopes, I gained knowledge of the vocabulary and thought processes needed to address climate change from the corporate side. I’ve also gained new insights into the importance of corporate organizational structures. Through this internship, I gained familiarity with visualization techniques, and I look forward to continuing my work with the BSPL.



Internship Year

2021

Project Category

Innovation and a New Energy Future

Organization(s)

Behavioral Science for Policy Lab, Princeton University

Mentor(s)

Elke Weber, Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment, Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs; Gregg Sparkman, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment; Jordana Composto, Ph.D. candidate, Psychology