Student Body

  • Amorim, Renato

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    My research focuses on improving the understanding of the link between Tropical Cyclones (TCs) and their associated impacts in the past and under future climate conditions. These impacts include inland and coastal flooding, rainfall-induced soil erosion, and ecosystem recovery. I am also interested in evaluating the accuracy of forecasting TC-related flood and surge compounding in different areas across the United States. I’m advised by Gabriele Villarini, professor in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

  • Bahl, Kushaan

    Chemical and Biological Engineering

    Kushaan’s research involves the investigation of a new class of catalyst supports based on tunable hydrogen bonded structures. He is investigating these supports for a variety of green reactions, including photocatalytic hydrogen generation, CO2 reduction, and relevant pharmaceutical coupling reactions. He is also interested in investigating hydrophobic zeolites for direct air capture of CO2, particularly in humid environments. Kushaan is advised by Professor Marcella Lusardi in the CBE department.

  • Bare, Fiona

    Politics

    Bare studies the political economy of climate change using game theory, statistical inference, and qualitative methods. Bare’s research explores the politics of uncertainty around climate change, including the impact of natural resource variability on cooperation. She is also interested in understanding how uncertainty affects bargaining power in international negotiations around climate finance and payment for ecosystem services. Another area of Bare’s research examines the role of non-state actors, such as private firms and interest groups, in climate policymaking. Bare is advised by Kris Ramsay, professor in the Department of Politics.

  • Blackshaw, Christine

    Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Chakravarti, Ananya

    Chemical and Biological Engineering

    Ananya’s research focuses on using molecular dynamics simulations and physics-based methods to elucidate temperature effects on biomolecular condensates. She aims to understand the governing rules of heat stress responses across species, with specific implications in climate change, and is using the models she builds to design thermoresponsive synthetic biomaterials for energy conservation. Ananya is very grateful to her advisor, assistant professor Jerelle Joseph in chemical and biological engineering, for her mentorship and guidance.

  • Chung, Maya

    Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    Chung studies the role of the ocean in climate from subseasonal to multi-century timescales. She also researches interactions between climate and infectious disease spread through the HMEI-STEP Fellowship. She is advised by professors Gabriel Vecchi (Geosciences, HMEI), Jessica Metcalf, and Bryan Grenfell (EEB, SPIA).

  • Elikan, Max

    Chemistry

    AY 23-24 PECS Student Dinner Coordinator

    Elikan is interested in advancing the biology, chemistry, and engineering interface towards applications in energy and the environment. Elikan’s current research involves engineering new photoswitchable high-affinity protein-protein interactions to be used in metabolic engineering for green chemical synthesis, new biomaterials, and protein purification. Ultimately, Elikan’s goal in the long-term is to engineer proteins and whole microorganisms for sustainable chemical production, renewable energy, and bioremediation using techniques and skills from analytical chemistry and chemical and biological engineering. Elikan is advised by José Avalos, Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment.

  • Hirose, Lynn

    Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    Hirose’s research is about the Earth’s energy budget, especially about the changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). OLR is modified by the greenhouse gas effects and the Earth’s climate states, and the balance between the absorbed solar radiation and OLR determines the net gain or loss of energy of the entire climate system. She utilizes theoretical computations and diagnostic analysis of model simulations and satellite observations. She is advised by Prof. V. Ramaswamy in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory.

  • Hoffenberg, Louis

    Chemical and Biological Engineering

    Hoffenberg uses molecular simulation to investigate the formation and behavior of catalytic nanoparticles in a plasma-enhanced pyrolysis process converting natural gas into H2 and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). If reactor conditions can be optimized to produce cheap CNTs out of abundant feedstocks, we would be able to turn methane into advanced carbon materials while getting zero-emissions H2 for free. Hoffenberg is advised by Prof. David Graves (Chemical and Biological Engineering) and Prof. Igor Kaganovich (Princeton Plasma Physics Lab).

  • Huang, Baichuan

    Electrical and Computer Engineering

    AY 23-24 PECS Faculty Dinner Coordinator

    Huang’s research focuses on the coherent control of mid-infrared Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) frequency combs to enhance their stability and spectral coverage for multi-trace-gas sensing. He is also studying the implementation of QCL frequency comb based photothermal spectroscopy for environmental sensing. Huang is advised by Gerard Wysocki, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Associated Faculty in the Princeton Materials Institute (PMI).

  • Jans, Mitchell

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Jans conducts research on fine-grained sediment dynamics to enhance understanding of the role of sediment properties on erosion and deposition rates. Increasing mechanistic understanding of this sediment class has important implications for pollutant fate and transport, as well as fluvial geomorphology. He is a member of Dr. Ian Bourg’s Interfacial Water Group in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

  • Kunes, Moriah

    Geosciences

    Kunes’ research aims to better understand the role of nitrogen cycling within the coral holobiont under normal and stressed conditions. My work uses 15N tracer experiments to determine where nitrogen is translocated within the coral holobiont and how surrounding environmental conditions may influence which nutritional mode, (photosynthesis vs. heterotrophy), corals use to acquire nitrogen. I’m hoping my studies will give insight into the health of the coral-algal partnership which is essential for coral survival. Kunes is advised by Bess Ward, the William J. Sinclair Professor of Geosciences and The High Meadows Environmental Institute

  • Leininger, Aaron

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Leininger engineers electrochemically-active microbiomes towards applications for sustainable anthropogenic carbon cycling with a focus on making water treatment cheaper and more efficient. He is a member of professor Jason Ren’s Water-Energy-Technologies (WET) Lab in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment.

  • Michalek, Alexander

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Michalek’s research focuses on the prediction of flood across local, regional, and continental scales under a changing climate. His research couples statistical, climatic, and hydrologic models to improve predictions of floods and leverage web-tool frameworks to relay information to the public. He works with Gabriele Villarini who is a professor in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

  • Rupp, Marco

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    AY 23-24 PECS Faculty Dinner Coordinator

    Rupp aims to control the chemical composition for metals in laser-based powder bed fusion. His research offers an innovative method of creating low carbon steel while reducing emissions as well as the energy required. Rupp is advised by Craig B. Arnold, professor in mechanical and aerospace engineering and vice dean for innovation.

  • Sevostianov, Vladislav

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Sevostianov works on field instrumentation for trace gas measurements. Specifically, he develops optical Mid-IR systems for nitrous oxide and ammonia quantification in agricultural settings. He is a joint PhD student in Civil and Environmental Engineering and Materials Science advised by Professor Mark Zondlo.

  • Sima, Matthew

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Sima aims to investigate the biodegradation of PFAS coupled with the Feammox reaction by the bacteria Acidimicrobium sp. Strain A6 on both a fundamental mechanistic and natural system level. His research uses models and experimental research to determine the role of different proteins in and the kinetics of this coupling process for use in in-situ remediation of polluted soils and wastewater treatment plant byproducts. Sima is also a 2023 HMEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellow. He is advised by Peter Jaffé, professor in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

  • Singer, Emily

    Molecular Biology

    I am studying the molecular mechanisms regulating the timing of heart development. My research focuses on a specific transcription factor, Mesp, and what genes it directly activates and when to ensure proper specification and migration of heart precursor cells. My work is done using the aquatic model organism Ciona intestinalis.

  • Smorada, Chiara

    Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Stone, Harry

    Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Tan, Jun Zhi

    Chemical Engineering

    AY 23-24 PECS Student Dinner Coordinator

    Tan’s research focuses on catalytic upcycling of plastic waste into more valuable chemical intermediates (e.g., gasoline and diesel) with the ultimate goal of reducing the amount of plastic waste that ends up in the landfill. He utilizes a combination of kinetic, spectroscopic, and thermal analyses to elucidate the mechanism of plastics deconstruction on bifunctional zeolites, which have important implications on the conversion rates and product selectivities of plastic upcycling reactions. Tan is co-advised by Professor Michele Sarazen and Professor Bruce Koel in chemical and biological engineering.

  • Tjo, Hansen

    Chemical and Biological Engineering

    Tjo’s research focuses on developing genome-editing and metabolic engineering tools in lignocellulose-degrading, non-model thermophiles. By lowering barriers to the manipulation of their metabolic pathways, such non-model microbes can be rapidly deployed in industrial contexts as next-generation cell factories for sustainable biofuels and biochemicals production. Tjo is advised by Jonathan Conway, Assistant Professor of Chemical & Biological Engineering.

  • Wang, Shukai

    Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Wani, M. Shaharyar

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    AY 23-24 PECS Student Coordinator

    Wani’s research focuses on developing bio-derived carbon aerogels, unraveling the formation mechanism, and using it for water and energy applications. He plans to develop carbon aerogel-based filters to remove contaminants like PFAS, and PFOA from the water. Wani is advised by Craig Arnold, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Vice Dean for Innovation.

  • Wright, Justin

    Music