Research led by Princeton’s Anu Ramaswami, the Sanjay Swani ’87 Professor of India Studies, professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI), and research specialist Graham Ambrose is the first to quantify the emotional well-being (happiness) that people experience while gardening at home. Their results — published in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning — suggest that household gardens could be key to providing food security in urban areas and making cities more sustainable and livable.

The infographic below breaks down the key findings of the study  — read the full story on the PEI homepage.

Princeton researchers found that gardening at home had a similar effect on people’s emotional well-being (or happiness) as biking, walking or dining out. The benefits of home gardening were similar across racial boundaries and between urban and suburban residents, and it was the only activity out of the 15 studied for which women and people with low incomes reported the highest emotional well-being. The results suggest that household gardens could be key to providing food security in urban areas and making cities more sustainable and livable. (Infographic by Mae-Yung Tang, Princeton Environmental Institute)