HMEI Faculty Seminar: “Understanding Species Responses to Climate Change: The Role of Population and Community Ecology”

Jonathan Levine, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, will illustrate the importance of basic population and community ecology in understanding — and predicting — how changing species interactions influence the way ecosystems respond to climate change. Levine will draw from field experiments that expose plants to novel competitors under warmer climate conditions — as well as laboratory experiments on how evolutionary processes influence plant migration — to argue for the interconnected nature of basic ecological research and research motivated by the need to solve pressing environmental challenges.

Corina Tarnita, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and director of the Program in Environmental Studies, will lead a discussion and Q&A after the main presentation.

This event will be held online via Zoom webinarregister online in advance to receive a webinar link. Levine is the final speaker in the Fall 2020 HMEI Faculty Seminar Series, which is open to the public. Additional speakers and dates in this series are:

Sept. 15

Eco-Swarāj: Can India Achieve Environmental Self-Rule?
Meera Subramanian, 2019-20 Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities

Oct. 6

Forever Chemicals No More: Harnessing the Novel Feammox Bacterium for PFAS Defluorination
Peter Jaffé, the William L. Knapp ’47 Professor of Civil Engineering and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Nov. 3

Monster. A Fugue in Fire and Ice
Anne McClintock
, the A. Barton Hepburn Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies

HMEI Faculty Seminar: “Understanding Species Responses to Climate Change: The Role of Population and Community Ecology”

Event Date

Tue, Dec 1, 2020 ・ 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Location

Online via Zoom

Jonathan Levine, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, will illustrate the importance of basic population and community ecology in understanding — and predicting — how changing species interactions influence the way ecosystems respond to climate change. Levine will draw from field experiments that expose plants to novel competitors under warmer climate conditions — as well as laboratory experiments on how evolutionary processes influence plant migration — to argue for the interconnected nature of basic ecological research and research motivated by the need to solve pressing environmental challenges.

Corina Tarnita, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and director of the Program in Environmental Studies, will lead a discussion and Q&A after the main presentation.

This event will be held online via Zoom webinarregister online in advance to receive a webinar link. Levine is the final speaker in the Fall 2020 HMEI Faculty Seminar Series, which is open to the public. Additional speakers and dates in this series are:

Sept. 15

Eco-Swarāj: Can India Achieve Environmental Self-Rule?
Meera Subramanian, 2019-20 Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities

Oct. 6

Forever Chemicals No More: Harnessing the Novel Feammox Bacterium for PFAS Defluorination
Peter Jaffé, the William L. Knapp ’47 Professor of Civil Engineering and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Nov. 3

Monster. A Fugue in Fire and Ice
Anne McClintock
, the A. Barton Hepburn Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies