Climate Mobilities: “Justice, Data, and Governance”

Climate mobility issues have been framed in various ways over time, beginning with the concept of “environmental migration,” moving to the “climate refugee” framing, and then evolving toward the dominance of the “migration as adaptation” approach.  New issues have been raised regarding immobility, both voluntary and involuntary; the historical sources of vulnerability; reparative justice, and loss and damage.  What are the ethical and pragmatic implications of framing climate mobilities through one or more of these lenses?  Are some framings more politically efficacious? What neglected climate mobility issues should future research consider?  Which existing international, domestic, and local institutions have most promise in addressing this issue?  The challenge of governing climate mobilities arises at various scales, from the local to the international–how are these challenges of scale best managed?  How might future climate (im)mobility governance be financed?

We are planning an exciting program with invited interdisciplinary speakers, combined with collaborative workshops and opportunities for networking.  Our aim for the conference is to curate a diverse and pluralistic conversation, not just within academia, but beyond it, drawing on a broad array of voices to encourage responsible and participatory research.

Room space is limited but the event will be accessible to all, including members of the public through a virtual live stream.

If you wish to attend, virtually or in-person, please fill out the registration form.

To see the full conference schedule and speakers list, please visit the conference event page.

Climate Mobilities: “Justice, Data, and Governance”

Event Date

Mon, May 20, 2024 - Tue, May 21, 2024

Location

Robertson Hall, Bowl 16

Category

Climate mobility issues have been framed in various ways over time, beginning with the concept of “environmental migration,” moving to the “climate refugee” framing, and then evolving toward the dominance of the “migration as adaptation” approach.  New issues have been raised regarding immobility, both voluntary and involuntary; the historical sources of vulnerability; reparative justice, and loss and damage.  What are the ethical and pragmatic implications of framing climate mobilities through one or more of these lenses?  Are some framings more politically efficacious? What neglected climate mobility issues should future research consider?  Which existing international, domestic, and local institutions have most promise in addressing this issue?  The challenge of governing climate mobilities arises at various scales, from the local to the international–how are these challenges of scale best managed?  How might future climate (im)mobility governance be financed?

We are planning an exciting program with invited interdisciplinary speakers, combined with collaborative workshops and opportunities for networking.  Our aim for the conference is to curate a diverse and pluralistic conversation, not just within academia, but beyond it, drawing on a broad array of voices to encourage responsible and participatory research.

Room space is limited but the event will be accessible to all, including members of the public through a virtual live stream.

If you wish to attend, virtually or in-person, please fill out the registration form.

To see the full conference schedule and speakers list, please visit the conference event page.