Alana Tornello, 2012, Comparative Literature

One of the goals of Princeton University’s Sustainability Master Plan is Resource Conservation, which identifies stormwater management and domestic water conservation as primary strategies for improving the University’s environmental stewardship. Within the confines of this plan, Washington Road Stream is currently slated for a restoration in the fall of 2010. This summer, Princeton Environmental Institute underwent the final phase of its assessment of Washington Road Stream and its effect on Carnegie Lake. This summer, I joined a group of interns to participate in the assessment and study of the stream and lake as a continuation of research conducted in the past few summers and during a spring 2010 course (ENV 340: Environmental Challenges and Sustainable Solutions). That research covered four main areas of study: riparian zone health, measurement of harmful nutrients, geomorphology assessment, and data collection (using YSI instrument) concerning changes in water quality. These phases were completed and will be compiled in a master report to be submitted to the University. This assessment will allow the restoration team to address any concerns raised based upon our data and conclusions. This pre-restoration data can also be useful in post-restoration research of Washington Road Stream and the surrounding watershed.