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Posted by Igor Heifetz on Mar 15, 2017
We know a lot about how carbon dioxide (CO2) levels can drive climate change, but how about the way that climate change can cause fluctuations in CO2 levels? New research from an international team of scientists reveals one of the mechanisms by which a colder climate was accompanied by...
 
 
Posted by Bennett McIntosh for the Office of the Dean for Research on Mar 13, 2017
Cities. They sprawl and tangle, juxtaposing ancient public squares and glistening skyscrapers. They provide homes for half of humanity, and economic and cultural centers for the rest. It has taken us thousands of years to build today's urban centers, and yet, they're expected to double in land-...
 
 
Posted by Igor Heifetz on Mar 03, 2017
In spring 2017, PEI is launching Global Perspectives on Environmental Justice. This event series will feature writers, filmmakers, other visual artists, and scholars whose work engages fundamental questions of environmental justice. Our visitors will address the political, imaginative and...
 
 
Posted by Sarah M. Binder on Feb 21, 2017
Jane Baldwin, a Ph.D. candidate in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at Princeton University, has received a top student paper award from the American Meteorological Society’s (AMS) Board on Environment and Health. Her winning presentation at AMS’ Eighth Conference on Environment and...
 
 
Posted by Igor Heifetz on Feb 21, 2017
Gabe Vecchi is a world-famous atmospheric scientist with a pretty simple attitude to making progress: In order to do something, you need to do it. And Gabe’s done a lot! He was born in Boston but grew up in Venezuela, and witnessed the country’s dissolution from an intellectual magnet...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications on Feb 16, 2017
For decades, among the most enduring questions for ecologists have been: "Why do species live where they do? And what are the factors that keep them there?" A Princeton University-based study featured on the February cover of the journal Ecology could prove significant in answering that...
 
 
Posted by Joanna M. Foster ’08 for the Princeton Environmental Institute on Feb 07, 2017
Princeton Environmental Institute has announced awards totaling $374,000 to support five faculty research projects as part of the Urban Grand Challenge – one of several long term research cooperatives that comprise its Grand Challenges program.  With the majority of the world’s population...
 
 
Posted by Holly Welles on Feb 06, 2017
​Corina Tarnita, a Princeton University assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and PEI associated faculty member, was among seven researchers nationwide to be named an Early Career Fellow of the Ecological Society of America (ESA). Fellows are ESA members who have or have potential...
 
 
Posted by Joanna M. Foster ’08 for the Princeton Environmental Institute on Feb 01, 2017
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) is pleased to welcome Gabriel Vecchi, Luc Deike, Laure Resplandy, and Xinning Zhang to the Princeton University faculty. Gabriel Vecchi Gabriel Vecchi joins the faculty as a professor with a joint appointment in PEI and the Department of Geosciences...
 
 
Posted by Wendy Plump for the Office of Engineering Communications on Jan 31, 2017
At a vegetable farm in West Africa, where the planting is done by hand, questions about weather boil down to the most urgent question of all:  Will the rains be good or bad? Princeton professor Eric Wood, a hydrologist who usually works with global data and computer models, visited the...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications on Jan 26, 2017
Until recently, Princeton University junior Anne Merrill wasn't aware of how time and distance can dampen a person's awareness of the pervasiveness and the toxic endurance of environmental degradation. As someone who is well-read on environmental topics and active in environmental clubs on...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications on Jan 19, 2017
Be it the Mima mounds of Washington state or the famous "fairy circles" of Namibia in southwestern Africa, people are captivated by the regular patterns of plant growth that blanket desert and grassland landscapes, often with mesmerizing consistency. Scientists have long debated how these...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly Office of Communications on Jan 19, 2017
Scientists from Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have produced the first global analysis of how climate change may affect the frequency and location of mild-weather days — and it may be soon. In a report published Jan. 18 in the journal...
 
 
Posted by Matt Soniak for the Office of Engineering Communications on Jan 13, 2017
In August 2015, a dust storm blanketed large areas of seven Middle East nations in a haze of dust and sand thick enough to obscure them from satellite view. The storm led to several deaths, thousands of cases of respiratory ailments and injuries, and canceled airline flights and closed ports....
 
 
Posted by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research on Jan 11, 2017
A new study has found that trees worldwide develop thicker bark when they live in fire-prone areas. The findings suggest that bark thickness could help predict which forests and savannas will survive a warmer climate in which wildfires are expected to increase in frequency. Trees in regions...
 
 
Posted by Igor Heifetz on Jan 06, 2017
This essay by Melissa Lane forms part of a series within the work programme of the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity, investigating the philosophical understandings of sustainable prosperity. Whose job is it to save the planet? Apart from a very few people—the director of...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications on Jan 04, 2017
The government of a low-lying island nation is considering the construction of a seawall to protect its capital and economic hub from the rising seas brought on by climate change. The length and expense of the project depends on how high the wall needs to be — 3 feet? Four? A wall that's too...
 
 
Posted by B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School on Dec 19, 2016
Responding to the challenges of climate change depends both on scientific assessment as well as value judgments by citizens, academics and policymakers. To explain the interconnectivity of science and value judgments, Princeton University’s Climate Futures Initiative (CFI) has...
 
 
Posted by Igor Heifetz on Dec 19, 2016
Major: Anthropology Professional role and organization: Project 55 Fellow and Charles Evans Future Conservation Leader at D&R Greenway Land Trust How do you define sustainability? The term sustainability is used extensively with a seeming variety of meanings, but to me sustainability...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications on Dec 02, 2016
NANYUKI, Kenya — Princeton University graduate student Tyler Coverdale and Ryan O'Connell of the Class of 2017 clap as they walk around the tall bushes surrounding the sprawling experiment site. Not in applause, or for self-motivation — but to alert any buffalo, elephants or other animals that...