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Posted by Morgan Kelly on Apr 24, 2018
Ryan Edwards, a graduate student in civil and environmental engineering and PEI-STEP fellow, has received the William L. Fisher Congressional Geoscience Fellowship from the American Geosciences Institute. Fellows spend a year in Washington, D.C., working as a staff member...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Apr 23, 2018
By Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute Birds and flowers out of sync, the integration of built and natural flood-control features, and frozen methane deep beneath the ocean are among the five projects recently funded by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) as part of its...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Apr 12, 2018
By Chris Emery for the Office of Engineering Communications Sewage treatment may be an unglamorous job, but bacteria are happy to do it. Sewage plants rely on bacteria to remove environmental toxins from waste so that the processed water can be safely discharged into oceans and rivers. Now, a...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Apr 09, 2018
By Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications Do smart kids make more friends? If others see their cleverness paying off, then yes — at least, that seems to be true for our primate cousins, ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), a team of Princeton University researchers reported April 5 paper in...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Apr 06, 2018
By Jamie Saxon, Princeton Office of Communications, and Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute In a panel discussion held April 3 at Princeton University, two “big chiefs” of New Orleans' Black Masking Indian groups explored the complex artistry and deep-seated community of the Black...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Apr 05, 2018
The Princeton Environmental Institute, a co-sponsor of the 2018 Princeton Environmental Film Festival, will host selected films on the Princeton University campus between April 8-15. The films will be screened on the dates and times listed below in the Friend Center, Room 101. A full festival...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Apr 02, 2018
By Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute On a hot morning last August, Princeton University rising sophomore Young Joo Choi crouched in the receding shade of a house in West Trenton, New Jersey, firing gamma rays into the dirt along the foundation. It's here that soil contamination...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Apr 02, 2018
By Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications Tim Treuer, a PEI-STEP fellow and Princeton Energy and Climate Scholar (PECS) in the Princeton Environmental Institute, was one of two Princeton University graduate students to be named a 2018 Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow by the...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Mar 26, 2018
Despite the threat of a global antibiotic-resistance crisis, the worldwide use of antibiotics in humans soared 39 percent between 2000 and 2015, fueled by dramatic increases in low-income and middle-income countries, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Mar 19, 2018
By Liz Fuller-Wright, Princeton Office of Communications History can tell us a lot about environmental upheaval, according to Princeton history professor and PEI associated faculty John Haldon and alumnus Lee Mordechai. What is missing in today’s debate about climate change is using what we know...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Mar 15, 2018
By Liz Fuller-Wright, Princeton Office of Communications The 2015 Paris climate agreement sought to stabilize global temperatures by limiting warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and pursue limiting warming even further to 1.5 degrees Celsius. To quantify what...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Mar 13, 2018
By Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute Ian Bourg, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Princeton Environmental Institute, has received a five-year, $400,000 CAREER award from the National Science Foundation to study the hydrology and mechanics of fine-...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Mar 09, 2018
The video for the Tuesday, March 6, PEI Faculty Seminar, "Environcide: War, Society, and Environment," by Emmanuel Kreike, Professor of History, is now available. Watch the entire seminar on PEI's YouTube channel. Kreike was the second speaker in the Spring 2018 PEI Faculty Seminar Series.
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Mar 08, 2018
By Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute A day at the beach beset by heavy clouds, or the sticky heat of a salty haze can seem like the work of large, unpredictable forces. But behind such atmospheric phenomena are billions of tiny interactions between the air and microscopic drops of...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Feb 28, 2018
By Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute Nowhere does the threat of climate change loom larger than in the world's cities. Millions of people around the world — not to mention our cultural, political and economic institutions — face obliteration from extreme flooding, scorching...
 
 
Posted by Igor Heifetz on Feb 27, 2018
By Liz Fuller-Wright, Princeton Office of Communications Have you ever wished you could travel inside a rock? It may sound more like magic than science, but Princeton scientists have found a way to make it (almost) true. With an industrial grinder and a super-high-resolution camera, PEI...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Feb 21, 2018
By Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute A new theory of plant evolution suggests that the 400 million-year drive of flora across the globe may not have been propelled by the above-ground traits we can see easily, but by underground adaptations that allowed plants to become more...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Feb 15, 2018
Mary Caswell Stoddard, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and PEI associated faculty, was among two Princeton University faculty members to be named a 2018 Sloan Research Fellows, along with 126 researchers from 53 colleges and universities in the United States and Canada....
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Feb 15, 2018
By B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School Heat waves are among the deadliest and most common of environmental extremes. As the earth continues to warm due to the buildup of greenhouse gases, heat waves are expected to become more severe, particularly for cities, where concrete and a dearth of...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly on Feb 14, 2018
By Jon Wallace for the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs A lot of pro-environmental messages suggest that people will feel guilty if they don’t make an effort to live more sustainably nor take steps to ameliorate climate change. But a recent study from Princeton...