Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

  • Young, Rachel

    Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

    Rachel Young is in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs’ Science, Technology and Environmental Policy Program. Her research uses quantitative methods to examine social issues at the intersection of climate science and public finance. Rachel’s recent work focuses on the long-run impact of hurricanes on labor and migration, as well as the welfare implications of place-based disaster response policies.

  • Ramamurthi, Pooja

    Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

    Ramamurthi studies at the School of Public Policy and International Affairs under Elke Weber. Her research interests lie at the intersection of political science and behavioural methods to understand how organisations and individuals make climate change relevant decisions. She hopes to use machine learning and network analysis to study how developing countries tackle their environmental objectives and policies and the pace at which these changes occur.

  • Peng, Liqun

    Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

    Peng is in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs’ Science, Technology and Environmental Policy program. Her research focuses on potential co-benefits for air quality, health and climate of low carbon technologies in transport and power sector, such as electrification of vehicle fleets, energy storage with increased penetration of renewable energy and vehicle-to-grid technology. She is applying an energy modeling to analyze the value of energy storage technologies to reduce renewable energy curtailment and mitigate air pollutant as well as CO2 emissions.

  • Crawford, Chris

    Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

    Crawford is studying how changing spatial patterns of agricultural land use are likely to affect biodiversity. In particular, he  focuses on areas of agricultural decline and abandonment to try to understand whether they represent opportunities for the conservation of biodiversity, and how to use policy to guide these transitions. Crawford is in the Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy (STEP) program in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs and is advised by David Wilcove, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and public affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute.

  • Choquette-Levy, Nicolas

    Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

    Choquette-Levy is in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs’ Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy program. His research focuses on the links between climate change and rural-urban migration in developing country contexts, with regional interests in Nepal and China. He is applying agent-based modelling and systems analysis methods to better understand how smallholder farming communities are using migration as a way to adapt to climate change, and how farmers’ social networks influence their decision-making around adaptation.

  • Benveniste, Hélène (‘18 - ‘20)

    Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

    Benveniste is in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs’ Program in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP). Her research focuses on quantifying economic impacts of climate change on human-migration patterns using integrated assessment models.

  • Alkon, Meir (‘17 - ‘19)

    Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

    Homepage: www.meiralkon.com

    Meir is a joint PhD candidate in the Department of Politics and the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs. A core theme of his research is the domestic politics of energy and the environment in large developing countries, specifically China and India, and their implications for climate change and global environmental governance. This research has spanned topics including India’s groundwater access and use; the political behavior basis of support for energy subsidies; the political economy of rural electrification programs; the public opinion consequences of urban air pollution; and the intergovernmental bargaining behind coal-fired and renewable power in China. His work in these areas combines insights from international and comparative political economy with an interdisciplinary approach.

  • Misra, Mayank (‘17 - ‘19)

    Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

    Mayank’s research interests lie at the intersection of human collective behavior, ecosystems, and climate change. He is particularly interested in socio-ecological coevolution dynamics and how human populations manage risk across different organizational and temporal scales.

    At the Levin Lab Mayank focuses on how socio-ecological relationships are transformed when tribal populations are integrated with State structures and formal markets. He studies the effects of integration on integrated groups, their native ecosystems, and the resilience of States and markets themselves. On a larger scale he also studies the effect of losing diverse socio-ecological relationships on human adaptability and resilience to global catastrophic risk.

    Mayank was formerly a civil rights lawyer in the High Courts of Delhi and Bombay, and at the Supreme Court of India. He completed a masters in Public Administration from the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs in 2014 and consulted for the Open Society foundations and UN peace keeping, before returning to Princeton as a PhD student.

  • Schulhofer, Sam (‘08 - ‘11)

    Princeton School of Public and International Affairs

    Schulhofer-Wohl’s research focused on macroeconomics, economic development and applied econometrics. Projects studied methods for distinguishing age, period and cohort effects; changes in the age structure of mortality in the course of an economy’s development; and the implications of heterogeneous preferences and heterogeneous income risk in macroeconomics. Ongoing research analyzes the effect of recent economic volatility on consumer behavior and the nature of migration in developing countries.