Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

  • Chase, Danielle

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    Chase studies the formation and relaxation of fluid-filled cracks in porous media using lab scale experiments and models. These processes are relevant to industrial and natural geophysical systems including hydraulic fracturing for extraction of oil and gas and relaxation of ice sheet uplift due to supraglacial lake drainage. She is advised by Professor Howard A. Stone in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering department.

  • Wilson, Jessica

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    Wilson studies diffusiophoresis (the spontaneous movement of a colloidal particle in a chemical gradient) and wetting phenomena.  She works in the Complex Fluids Group and is advised by Howard A. Stone, the Donald R. Dixon ’69 and Elizabeth W. Dixon Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, professor of mechanical engineering and chair of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

  • Brunner, Claudia

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    Brunner works  in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, where she is advised by Marcus Hultmark. Her efforts attempt to better understand the aerodynamics of wind turbines through experimental studies of fluid dynamics at high Reynolds numbers. Her research focuses on dynamic stall and its effects on the performance of vertical axis wind turbines, as well as field experiments using nanoscale hot-wires to measure small-scale turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer.

  • Deike, Luc

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    Research focuses on multi-phase turbulent systems, involving waves, drops and bubbles in turbulent environment. We develop laboratory and numerical experiments to explore the physics at play and build simple models. Our work is motivated by environmental and industrial applications, as diverse as the statistics of waves in the ocean, wave impact on structures, floating ice sheet, gas transfer by surface breaking waves in the ocean, spray dynamics and cloud formation in the atmosphere.

    Past work has focused on diverse subjects than can be summarized in the three following areas: 1) the role of wave breaking in air-sea interaction, 2) wave turbulence and 3) hydro-elastic waves.

    Future work will involve turbulence in two-fluids systems, such as droplets/bubbles in a turbulent environment, as well as further studies on non-linear waves.

  • Hodson, Thomas (‘17 - ‘19)

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    Thomas Hodson is a graduate student in the Mechanical & Aerospace Department advised by Prof. Dan Steingart. Before coming to Princeton, Thomas was a Patent Examiner at the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office, specializing in Battery & Fuel Cell technologies. His research involves characterization of structural and electrochemical evolution in electrochemical cells using ultrasonic acoustic methods. Presently, his research focuses on understanding the changes that occur in lithium-ion batteries during an initial break-in period of operation. Thomas received his B.Eng. degree in Chemical Engineering from the City College of New York.

  • Arnold, Craig (‘08 - ‘13)

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    Research in the Arnold group primarily focuses on laser processing and transport in materials with particular emphasis on shaping laser-material interactions. The group strives to develop a deep understanding of the fundamental materials and optical physics, in order to have a direct impact on applications at the frontiers of technology in fields ranging from energy to biology and imaging to nanoscience.

    Key examples of Arnold’s work in this area include the research and development of optical trap assisted direct-write nanopatterning (Trap and Zap), the tunable acoustic gradient index of refraction (TAG) lens for high-speed varifocal imaging and materials processing, laser direct-write printing for complex materials in biological and energy applications, and solution based printing methods of chalcogenide glass for mid-infrared photonic applications. The research is primarily experimental in nature with a mix of fundamental and applied projects

  • Zheng, Zhong (‘12 - ‘14)

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    Zhong has broad interests in energy science, engineering and policy issues. Zhong’s research includes: dynamics of liquid propagation in and leakage from porous reservoirs motivated by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) processes; CCS source-sink match, early demonstration, and international collaboration opportunities; coupled decision-making processes on energy technology development among countries and stakeholders considering a possible climate shock; energy system integration, and China energy strategy and policy.

  • Stein, Celine (‘11 - ‘13)

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    Celine’s research is on SF6 detection by lasers with the method Radar REMPI. SF6 is both a greenhouse gas and analogous to UF6. UF6 detection would enable the recognition of clandestine nuclear enrichment facilities and thus allow the development of nuclear energy.

  • Padilla, Lauren (‘08 - ‘10)

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    Lauren’s research focused on reducing the uncertainty in climate feedbacks and sensitivity by applying methods from optimization and control theory to simple climate models. Interactions among feedback processes, which enhance or dampen the climate’s basic radiative response to natural and anthropogenic forcing, are not easily investigated in complex coupled climate models. Instead, we developed simple physically-based energy balance models resolving individual feedbacks to study the propagation of uncertainty from feedback to climate response.

    Additionally, the simple models’ parameters were formally optimized to reproduce the climate of the past century, which placed constraints on projections of future climate change. Our eventual goal was to provide narrower estimates of the equilibrium climate sensitivity and transient climate response. Before coming to Princeton, Lauren worked on engine control systems for Ford Motor Company and the Environmental Protection Agency.