Electrical Engineering

  • Blaisdell-Pijuan, Paris

    Electrical Engineering

    Blaisdell-Pijuan works in the Gmachl Group in the Department of Electrical Engineering. His research focuses on utilization of infrared light to efficiently promote chemical reactions by selectively driving reactants over chemical barriers with a laser. Currently, he is targeting the reaction of ammonia degradation for hydrogen storage applications.

  • Gmachl, Claire (‘09 - ‘11)

    Electrical Engineering

    Gmachl’s research group is working on the development of new quantum devices, especially lasers, and their optimization for systems applications ranging from sensors to optical communications. Their special focus is currently on Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers, a novel type of semiconductor injection laser based on electronic intersubband transitions in the conduction band of a coupled quantum well heterostructure. Quantum wells are only few atomic layers thick slivers of one type of semiconductor material interleaved with another type of semiconductor, the barrier. Many performance features of the lasers, e.g. their emission wavelength in the mid- to far-infrared, power, or modulation capabilities, are designed into the device by choice of the quantum well and barriers thicknesses.

    Current projects include the development of high temperature, high power, high efficiency QC lasers. Widely tunable, monolithic and external cavity, QC lasers are being developed for optical sensors in environmental, medical, and security applications. While Gmachl’s group is focused mainly on the development of the lasers, they maintain strong collaborations with many expert spectroscopists in academia, government and industrial labs, who are building sensor systems.

  • Yao, Yu (‘10 - ‘11)

    Electrical Engineering

    Yu’s research focuses on Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers, a type of semiconductor lasers based on intersubband transitions in coupled quantum well heterostructures. The laser emission wavelength can be flexibly tailored to cover the mid- to far-infrared wavelength region. She has enjoyed playing with hundreds of quantum wells to achieve novel QC laser designs with wide voltage tuning range, broad wavelength coverage as well as high power and efficiency.

    Her research group are closely collaborated with many experts in spectroscopy, environmental sensing, medical diagnosis, etc. Their goal is to develop QC lasers that serve a wider range of applications.

  • Smith, Clinton (‘11 - ‘13)

    Electrical Engineering

    As a member of Professor Wysocki’s research group, Clinton researches and develops novel methods and instruments for laser-based trace gas spectroscopy: focusing on developing a low-power, portable, CO2 sensor that can reliably, under varying environmental conditions, detect sub-ppm changes in CO2 concentration while deployed in the field.

    Clinton also collaborates with Professor Zondlo in Civil and Environmental Engineering to develop a novel real-time calibration technique for integration with our portable sensors, and to fly one of the CO2 sensors on a UAV as part of a demonstration project for autonomous environmental sensing.

  • Ravikumar, Arvind (‘13 - ‘15)

    Electrical Engineering

    Arvind Ravikumar is a third year graduate student in Electrical Engineering at Princeton University. Working with Prof. Claire Gmachl, his research focuses on developing new and efficient Quantum Cascade laser based technology for health and environmental sensing applications as a part of the multi-university research center, MIRTHE. He is currently involved in developing short wavelength mid-infrared Quantum Cascade lasers and high performance broadband photodetectors using a new II-VI material system.

  • Bilgir, Ozlem (‘10 - ‘11)

    Electrical Engineering

    Ozlem’s research focuses on decreasing the energy consumption and the carbon footprint of Data Centers. Data Centers’ energy consumption was around 60billion kWh in 2006 and this amount will be doubled between 2006 and 2011. Moreover, data centers cause even more carbon emissions than some countries. By using the resources efficiently, the energy consumption and the carbon emission can be reduced. Currently, Ozlem is working on the Chip Multiprocessor (CMP) technologies and exploring alternative ways to manage the cores in a way to contribute to the reduction in the energy consumption.

  • Wysocki, Gerard

    Electrical Engineering

    Wysocki conducts research that is primarily focused on the development of mid-infrared laser spectroscopic instrumentation for applications in trace-gas detection and chemical sensing. The target applications range from atmospheric chemistry, environmental detection and bio-medical research, to industrial emission monitoring and process control.

    His current research interests include development of new tunable mid-infrared lasers and their applications to multi-species molecular detection, studies of new molecular dispersion sensing techniques for in-situ and remote chemical analysis and quantification, mid-infrared radiometry for passive atmospheric sounding and development of distributed laser-spectroscopic sensor networks for real-time, large-area, in-situ trace-gas monitoring and pollution mapping.

  • Wagner, Sigurd

    Electrical Engineering

    Sigurd Wagner is seeking to introduce fundamentally new electronic materials. He has been working in three areas: (i) new materials for solar cells; (ii) hydrogenated amorphous silicon; and (iii) flexible, conformably shaped and stretchable large-area displays, electrotextiles, and electronic skin. At present he is developing an environmental barrier layer for organic electronics, and is collaborating with colleagues on the integration of flexible electronics into complete systems. Beginning with work at Bell Laboratories, where he co-invented the CuInSe2 (CIS), CuInS2, and Cu2CdSnS4 solar cells, among others, he has had a long-standing interest in solar energy conversion.

  • Jhaveri, Janam (‘14 - ‘16)

    Electrical Engineering

    Janam is a graduate student in Electrical Engineering advised by Professor James C. Sturm. His research interests lie in developing novel technologies to reduce the cost of solar photovoltaics (PV) and achieve grid parity. For silicon solar cells, which form ~90% of the PV market, a significant and slowly declining component of the cost is due to the high-temperature (> 800°C) processing required to form p-n junctions. Janam is working towards fabricating low-cost silicon/organic and silicon/metal-oxide heterojunctions at low temperatures to replace the p-n junction while maintaining high power conversion efficiencies.