Civil and Environmental Engineering

  • Anand, Shashank

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Anand focuses his research on understanding the emergence of complex networks in natural ecosystems, such as drainage networks in the landscape, xylem-phloem networks in the plant, etc. He is particularly interested in analyzing the evolution and organization of topographic features and their effects on sediment and water transport, as well as ecosystem regulation. His adviser is Amilcare Porporato, the Thomas J. Wu ’94 Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Princeton Environmental Institute.

  • Hajirezaie, Sassan

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Hajirezaie works with Professor Catherine A. Peters, Chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering where he focuses on developing approaches to control the migration of fluids in subsurface technologies such as geothermal energy production, subsurface remediation, oil and gas production, and energy storage. Hajirezaie is investigating the conditions that could lead to the precipitation of minerals in underground fractures, and the impacts of precipitation on fracture hydraulic properties and carbon dioxide leakage.

  • Su, Yibing

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Su is in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering where she studies hydrometeorology. Her research focuses on addressing the question of how hard it can rain at time durations critical to urban watersheds. Su develops hydrometeorological procedures to analyze the physical mechanisms and variables producing extreme short-duration rainfall and gain insight on the upper physical bound to rainfall intensity. A specific focus has been paid on Extratropical Cyclone systems given their destructive potential in producing extreme rainfall and flooding.

  • Tao, Yiheng

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Based in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tao works  with Professor Michael Celia. Tao is interested in analyzing energy development and climate change mitigation from engineering, policy, and economic perspectives. Specifically, his research focuses on numerical modeling of carbon dioxide injection into deep geological formations, carbon emissions implications of China-proposed Belt and Road Initiative, and the viability of carbon capture and storage technologies in the U.S. and China.

  • Sun, Emily (‘18 - ‘20)

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Sun works in the group of Ian Bourg, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Princeton Environmental Institute, studying multiphase flow at the interfaces of minerals, water, carbon dioxide and organics, with the goal of understanding fundamental phenomena and improving predictive capabilities in carbon cycling.

  • Hartzell, Samantha (‘18 - ‘20)

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Hartzell focuses her research on understanding the ecohydrology of water-limited ecosystems, including deserts, tundra and rainforest canopies. She is particularly interested in Crassulacean acid metabolism, or CAM photosynthesis, which is an ecological adaptation that affords plants in arid conditions a 500 percent increase in water-use efficiency. Her adviser is Amilcare Porporato, the Thomas J. Wu ’94 Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Princeton Environmental Institute.

  • He, Xiaogang (‘17 - ‘19)

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Xiaogang He is a Ph.D. candidate in the Civil and Environmental Engineering. His research interest focuses on the fundamental understanding of how climate change and climate variability affect the global flood and drought risk (FDR) and how we can improve the predictability of these extreme events to reduce their potential impact. Xiaogang has been developing a multi-scale physically motivated, information-theoretic framework to better quantify and diagnose changes in FDR in relation to climate variability and change, and anthropogenic influences such as water management (e.g., reservoir operations, irrigation, water withdraws). This framework can help to decouple the complex interaction mechanisms and identify key processes that drive the long-term changes in FDR across different spatial and temporal scales. In order to transfer science into action, Xiaogang is working on the development of an online operational Global Flood and Drought Monitor system with an objective of improving FDR management over the globe. This high-resolution (~25 km) system can provide information on historical, present and predicted/projected hydrological conditions at different time scales, which are important to many sectors, including water, agriculture and food security, energy production, infrastructure and ecosystem health. It also has ramifications for disaster preparedness and mitigation, policy making and political response to climate change.

  • Smith, Brianne (‘13 - ‘15)

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Brianne’s research interests involve hydrology and hydroclimatology of heavy rainfall and flooding in urban areas. Her research focuses on urban modification to the water cycle and creating better physical understanding of urban flooding. This work includes a focus on regional precipitation climatology and urban modification of flood-producing  rainfall as well as urban watershed modeling. An increased physical understanding of urban flooding will help to prepare cities to better prepare for heavy rainfall in a changing climate.

  • Lin, Ning (‘08 - ‘10)

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Ning’s research topic was Hurricane Multihazards Risk Analysis. Hurricanes often induce large amount of damage to coastal areas, due to combined effects of strong winds, heavy rainfall, and storm-surge. Moreover, the risk of these hazards may be greatly increased in the future, due to climate change and sea level rise. Her group applied a mesoscale meteorology model, a structural vulnerability model, and a hydrodynamic model to investigate these hazards. Their ultimate goal was to develop a stochastic framework to access the joint risk of these hurricane-associated hazards in the context of climate change.