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Environmental Ecology

The ecological costs of war in Africa

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 1:00pm

After years of examining conflict in Africa's protected areas, Princeton researchers Joshua Daskin and Robert Pringle report in the journal Nature that war has been a consistent factor in the decades-long decline of Africa's large mammals. But they also found that wildlife populations rarely collapsed to the point where recovery was impossible, meaning that even protected areas severely affected by conflict are promising candidates for conservation and rehabilitation.

Farms, petroculture and the Environmental Nexus: Four new environmental studies courses and ENV 200 for Spring 2018

Publish Date: 
Monday, December 4, 2017 - 12:00pm

Four new environmental studies courses and the popular "Environmental Nexus" class are among the many Spring 2018 classes from PEI's Certificate Program in Environmental Studies. Registration begins Dec. 6.

Study of Darwin’s finches reveals that new species can develop in as little as two generations

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 1:45pm

Princeton University researchers B. Rosemary Grant and Peter Grant, along with researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden, have found that a new species of Darwin’s finches developed in as little as two generations, which provides direct genetic evidence of a novel way in which new species arise. The Grants have been studying the evolution of Darwin’s finches on the small island of Daphne Major in the Galápagos Islands for the last four decades.

PEI Faculty Seminar Series: Ocean Acidification

Fall 2017 PEI Faculty Seminar Series - 11/7/2017

François M.M. Morel, Albert G. Blanke, Jr., Professor of Geosciences, professor of geosciences and the Princeton Environmental Institute

Undergrads, grads present work at NYC Student Conference on Conservation Science

Publish Date: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 3:00pm

Seven Princeton University undergraduates and three graduate students presented their research at the 2017 Student Conference on Conservation Science (SCCS) held at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City Oct. 11-13. The conference was co-sponsored by Princeton and organized by the museum's Center for Biodiversity and Conservation.

Drones, Thorns and New Orleans: PEI's Summer of Learning Symposium features breadth of undergrad research

Publish Date: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 9:15am

Drones in Africa, algal biofuel and the necessity of thorns. These topics and more constituted the varied research projects of 88 Princeton University undergraduates who presented the results of their summer-long internships during the Princeton Environmental Institute's 2017 Summer of Learning Symposium Oct. 6 at the Campus Club.

Taplin Environmental Lecture: "The Future of Water" by Peter Gleick

Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm Peter Gleick, President Emeritus of the Pacific Institute and a renowned expert on water and climate issues, will present, "The Future of Water," at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 26, in Guyot Hall, Room 10. Gleick is the chief scientist, president emeritus and co-founder of the Pacific Institute in Oakland, California. He is appearing as part of the Taplin Environmental Lecture series.

To Predict How Climate Change Will Affect Disease, Researchers Must Fuse Climate Science and Biology

Publish Date: 
Monday, September 18, 2017 - 11:00am

Predicting how climate change will affect the incidence of infectious diseases is made difficult by the complex relationship between climate and disease. In a recent review paper, PEI associated faculty Jessica Metcalf, a Princeton assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and public affairs, and coauthors write that researchers need new statistical models that incorporate both climate factors and the climate-disease relationship, and account for uncertainties in both.

PEI Urban Challenge awards $348,000 to new urban sustainability projects

Publish Date: 
Monday, September 18, 2017 - 12:30pm

Extreme ocean waves, severe thunderstorms and urban flooding, and a sophomore urban-design course make up the latest round of projects funded by PEI's Urban Grand Challenges program. Totaling $348,000, the new awards combine the study of the natural and built environments to address the interrelated environmental and social issues facing the world's rapidly expanding urban areas in a world of increasing volatility.

Leaks will not sink carbon capture and storage

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - 9:00am

The case for carbon capture and storage — a promising method for reducing greenhouse gases — received a boost recently from a Princeton study that indicated the procedure would not be prone to significant leakage or high costs related to fixing leaks. Authors of the study included PEI associated faculty Catherine Peters, professor and chair of civil and environmental engineering, and Michael Oppenheimer, the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute

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