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Environmental Ecology

Eight graduate students receive 2017 Hack Awards for study of water issues

Publish Date: 
Friday, July 21, 2017 - 10:30am

Eight Princeton University graduate students were selected to receive a Mary and Randall Hack ’69 Graduate Award from the Princeton Environmental Institute. The award provides up to $8,000 in research funding to Princeton graduate students exploring water and water-related topics. The 2017 recipients are Kessie Alexandre, Keita DeCarlo, Ying Liu, Hamid Omidvar, Melany Ruiz, Kimia Shahi, Kaia Tombak and Siyuan (Henry) Xian.

Methane, light and river trade: 2017 Walbridge Fund empowers innovative environmental graduate research

Publish Date: 
Friday, July 21, 2017 - 10:30am

Five Princeton University graduate students have been selected to receive Walbridge Fund Graduate Awards from the Princeton Environmental Institute to support their doctoral research. Established in 2009, the Walbridge Fund provides up to $10,000 to Princeton graduate students pursuing innovative projects in the fields of energy technology, carbon policy and climate science.

Hatching a new hypothesis about egg shape diversity

Publish Date: 
Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 2:45pm

The research of Mary Caswell Stoddard, a Princeton University assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and PEI-affiliated faculty, suggests that the shape of an egg for a bird of a given species may be driven in part by features of a bird’s physiology related to its capability for flight.

A passion for nature drives senior Zoe Sims' excellence in environmental studies

Publish Date: 
Monday, June 5, 2017 - 11:00am

Zoe Sims, who will receive her degree in ecology and evolutionary biology and a certificate in environmental studies on June 6, has distinguished herself as a scientist and a student during her time at Princeton. She is motivated by a love of the environment and overcoming the challenges of field work. She received the Environmental Studies Senior Thesis Prize at PEI Class Day on June 5 for her study on the effect of groundwater pollution on coral reefs in Bermuda.

Protecting nature, preserving humanity: A Q&A with Robert Pringle

Publish Date: 
Friday, June 2, 2017 - 9:45am

Robert Pringle, a Princeton University assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, advocates in a June 1 perspective piece in the journal Nature for a global effort to upgrade and enlarge protected areas. In this Q&A, Pringle discusses his article, the need to defend and shore up protected areas, and how, if we forsake our remaining wild places, we risk losing the foundations of a healthy planet and the links to other living things that make us human.

Nitrogen contained in coral provides evidence of human impact on the open ocean

Publish Date: 
Friday, May 19, 2017 - 10:30am

“Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is, perhaps, substantially less severe than has been argued,” said PEI affiliated faculty, Daniel Sigman. In other words, the results of this study suggest that atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the open ocean “is not the problem we may need to worry the most about,” he said. 

PEI Faculty Seminar Series: Environmental Martyrdom and Defenders of the Forest

Spring 2017 PEI Faculty Seminar Series - 3/7/2017

Robert Nixon, Thomas A. and Currie C. Barron Family Professor in Humanities and the Environment. Professor of English and the Princeton Environmental Institute.

How Temperature Guides Where Species Live and Where They'll Go

Publish Date: 
Thursday, February 16, 2017 - 11:30am

For decades, among the most enduring questions for ecologists have been: "Why do species live where they do? And what are the factors that keep them there?" A Princeton University-based study featured on the February cover of the journal Ecology could prove significant in answering that question, particularly for animals in the world's temperate mountain areas.

In African 'Fairy Circles,' a Template for Nature's Many Patterns

Publish Date: 
Thursday, January 19, 2017 - 4:00pm

Be it the Mima mounds of Washington state or the famous "fairy circles" of Namibia in southwestern Africa, people are captivated by the regular patterns of plant growth that blanket desert and grassland landscapes, often with mesmerizing consistency.

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