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Environmental Ecology

How Temperature Guides Where Species Live and Where They'll Go

Publish Date: 
Thursday, February 16, 2017 - 11:30am

For decades, among the most enduring questions for ecologists have been: "Why do species live where they do? And what are the factors that keep them there?" A Princeton University-based study featured on the February cover of the journal Ecology could prove significant in answering that question, particularly for animals in the world's temperate mountain areas.

In African 'Fairy Circles,' a Template for Nature's Many Patterns

Publish Date: 
Thursday, January 19, 2017 - 4:00pm

Be it the Mima mounds of Washington state or the famous "fairy circles" of Namibia in southwestern Africa, people are captivated by the regular patterns of plant growth that blanket desert and grassland landscapes, often with mesmerizing consistency.

Tree-Bark Thickness Indicates Fire-Resistance in a Hotter Future

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 10:15am

A new study has found that trees worldwide develop thicker bark when they live in fire-prone areas. The findings suggest that bark thickness could help predict which forests and savannas will survive a warmer climate in which wildfires are expected to increase in frequency.

Wild science: Photos from the Mpala Research Centre

For Princeton University faculty and students, the Mpala Research Centre, a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional field laboratory that sits on a 50,000-acre reserve and ranch in central Kenya, provides an expansive natural terrain ideal for large-scale field experiments in ecology, biology, geology and other fields. Students and other researchers at Mpala work in a setting where the human and natural worlds intersect, one of great natural beauty and diversity.

Wild Science: The Nature of the Mpala Research Centre

Publish Date: 
Friday, December 2, 2016 - 3:45pm

NANYUKI, Kenya — Princeton University graduate student Tyler Coverdale and Ryan O'Connell of the Class of 2017 clap as they walk around the tall bushes surrounding the sprawling experiment site. Not in applause, or for self-motivation — but to alert any buffalo, elephants or other animals that might be foraging for food or seeking shade from the intense equatorial sun.

PEI Faculty Seminar Series Video: Competition, Hydraulic Damage, and the Universal Rules Regulating Plant Water Use

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 2:30pm

PEI Faculty Seminar Series Video: Lead Exposure and the Black-White Test Score Gap

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 10:30am

Bringing People Together as Scientists to Save a Zebra Species

Publish Date: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016 - 3:00pm

NANYUKI, Kenya — For 30 long minutes, the two safari buses trundled across the dry bushland of northern Kenya. Rocks and a haze of red dust kicked up from the rough and pitted road. The sun seared through the cloudless sky and thin air of the high escarpment, illuminating the leaves and long blanched thorns of the acacia trees.

Diversified Farming Systems: Benefits and Obstacles

Claire Kremen (born 1961) is an American biologist, and professor of conservation biology at University of California, Berkeley.

She graduated from Stanford University with a B.S. in Biology in 1982, and from Duke University with a PhD in Zoology in 1987.[2] She studies the impacts of deforestation in Madagascar, on species distributions with a Web-based biodiversity database.

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