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Environmental Ecology

Taplin Environmental Lecture: "The Future of Water" by Peter Gleick

Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm Peter Gleick, President Emeritus of the Pacific Institute and a renowned expert on water and climate issues, will present, "The Future of Water," at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 26, in Guyot Hall, Room 10. Gleick is the chief scientist, president emeritus and co-founder of the Pacific Institute in Oakland, California. He is appearing as part of the Taplin Environmental Lecture series.

To Predict How Climate Change Will Affect Disease, Researchers Must Fuse Climate Science and Biology

Publish Date: 
Monday, September 18, 2017 - 11:00am

Predicting how climate change will affect the incidence of infectious diseases is made difficult by the complex relationship between climate and disease. In a recent review paper, PEI associated faculty Jessica Metcalf, a Princeton assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and public affairs, and coauthors write that researchers need new statistical models that incorporate both climate factors and the climate-disease relationship, and account for uncertainties in both.

PEI Urban Challenge awards $348,000 to new urban sustainability projects

Publish Date: 
Monday, September 18, 2017 - 12:30pm

Extreme ocean waves, severe thunderstorms and urban flooding, and a sophomore urban-design course make up the latest round of projects funded by PEI's Urban Grand Challenges program. Totaling $348,000, the new awards combine the study of the natural and built environments to address the interrelated environmental and social issues facing the world's rapidly expanding urban areas in a world of increasing volatility.

Leaks will not sink carbon capture and storage

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - 9:00am

The case for carbon capture and storage — a promising method for reducing greenhouse gases — received a boost recently from a Princeton study that indicated the procedure would not be prone to significant leakage or high costs related to fixing leaks. Authors of the study included PEI associated faculty Catherine Peters, professor and chair of civil and environmental engineering, and Michael Oppenheimer, the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute

Eight graduate students receive 2017 Hack Awards for study of water issues

Publish Date: 
Friday, July 21, 2017 - 10:30am

Eight Princeton University graduate students were selected to receive a Mary and Randall Hack ’69 Graduate Award from the Princeton Environmental Institute. The award provides up to $8,000 in research funding to Princeton graduate students exploring water and water-related topics. The 2017 recipients are Kessie Alexandre, Keita DeCarlo, Ying Liu, Hamid Omidvar, Melany Ruiz, Kimia Shahi, Kaia Tombak and Siyuan (Henry) Xian.

Methane, light and river trade: 2017 Walbridge Fund empowers innovative environmental graduate research

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Friday, July 21, 2017 - 10:30am

Five Princeton University graduate students have been selected to receive Walbridge Fund Graduate Awards from the Princeton Environmental Institute to support their doctoral research. Established in 2009, the Walbridge Fund provides up to $10,000 to Princeton graduate students pursuing innovative projects in the fields of energy technology, carbon policy and climate science.

Hatching a new hypothesis about egg shape diversity

Publish Date: 
Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 2:45pm

The research of Mary Caswell Stoddard, a Princeton University assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and PEI-affiliated faculty, suggests that the shape of an egg for a bird of a given species may be driven in part by features of a bird’s physiology related to its capability for flight.

A passion for nature drives senior Zoe Sims' excellence in environmental studies

Publish Date: 
Monday, June 5, 2017 - 11:00am

Zoe Sims, who will receive her degree in ecology and evolutionary biology and a certificate in environmental studies on June 6, has distinguished herself as a scientist and a student during her time at Princeton. She is motivated by a love of the environment and overcoming the challenges of field work. She received the Environmental Studies Senior Thesis Prize at PEI Class Day on June 5 for her study on the effect of groundwater pollution on coral reefs in Bermuda.

Protecting nature, preserving humanity: A Q&A with Robert Pringle

Publish Date: 
Friday, June 2, 2017 - 9:45am

Robert Pringle, a Princeton University assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, advocates in a June 1 perspective piece in the journal Nature for a global effort to upgrade and enlarge protected areas. In this Q&A, Pringle discusses his article, the need to defend and shore up protected areas, and how, if we forsake our remaining wild places, we risk losing the foundations of a healthy planet and the links to other living things that make us human.

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