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Environmental Conservation

The ecological costs of war in Africa

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 1:00pm

After years of examining conflict in Africa's protected areas, Princeton researchers Joshua Daskin and Robert Pringle report in the journal Nature that war has been a consistent factor in the decades-long decline of Africa's large mammals. But they also found that wildlife populations rarely collapsed to the point where recovery was impossible, meaning that even protected areas severely affected by conflict are promising candidates for conservation and rehabilitation.

Princeton, Stockholm University team up to explore ‘Earth in 2050’ global environment

Publish Date: 
Thursday, December 7, 2017 - 10:30am

Princeton University welcomed researchers from the Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University for “Earth in 2050: Boundaries, Obstacles and Opportunities,” which focused on key issues related to the global environment, including food security, urban infrastructure, biodiversity and conservation biology, human behavior, and water quality. The Nov. 12-14 conference was by the Princeton International Fund, the Princeton Environmental Institute and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment.

Freshman seminar asks students to envision their future in a changing climate

Publish Date: 
Monday, December 11, 2017 - 1:00pm

The freshman seminar, “Time Capsules for Climate Change,” asks students to use emerging science to think about the future of humanity under climate change and possible strategies for mitigation. Taught by Rob Socolow, professor emeritus of mechanical and aerospace engineering and associated faculty in the Princeton Environmental Institute, the students are writing four essays that will be placed in time capsules to be opened at their graduation in 2021 and at their 10-, 25- and 50-year reunions. The time capsules are being stored in Princeton’s Mudd Library.

No more free rides: How to value and govern water for the future

Publish Date: 
Thursday, December 7, 2017 - 12:00pm

Efforts to provide the world with clean and accessible water unravel when people try to determine how much water is actually worth, according to a paper published Nov. 24 in the journal Science. The paper's 13 authors lay out four steps for valuing and governing water sustainably. Based at institutions and universities around the world — including Princeton University — the researchers wrote the paper for the Valuing Water Initiative announced in May by the United Nations and the World Bank, which intends to identify methods for determining the value of water.

Farms, petroculture and the Environmental Nexus: Four new environmental studies courses and ENV 200 for Spring 2018

Publish Date: 
Monday, December 4, 2017 - 12:00pm

Four new environmental studies courses and the popular "Environmental Nexus" class are among the many Spring 2018 classes from PEI's Certificate Program in Environmental Studies. Registration begins Dec. 6.

Room to grow: Princeton's Vertical Farming Project

Princeton University’s Vertical Farming Project was established as a model vertical farm — which involves growing food crops indoors on stacked shelves — to generate accessible and up-to-date research for the field.  Video by Nick Donnoli, Office of Communications.

Drones, Thorns and New Orleans: PEI's Summer of Learning Symposium features breadth of undergrad research

Publish Date: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 9:15am

Drones in Africa, algal biofuel and the necessity of thorns. These topics and more constituted the varied research projects of 88 Princeton University undergraduates who presented the results of their summer-long internships during the Princeton Environmental Institute's 2017 Summer of Learning Symposium Oct. 6 at the Campus Club.

Amilcare Porporato, 10 associated faculty join PEI

Publish Date: 
Thursday, September 28, 2017 - 11:15am

The Princeton Environmental Institute has added core faculty member Amilcare Porporato, professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Princeton Environmental Institute, and 10 associated faculty to its roster of researchers and educators whose work focuses on or relates to the environment.

Orange is the New Green: How Orange Peels Revived a Costa Rican Forest

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 10:00am

A team led by Princeton University researchers — including David Wilcove, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and public affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute — found that a barren pasture in a Costa Rican national park became a lush forest 16 years after an orange juice company unloaded 1,000 truckloads of orange peels and orange pulp onto it. The researchers report in the journal Restoration Ecology a 176 percent increase in aboveground biomass within the 3-hectare (7-acre) area studied, which demonstrates the power of agricultural waste to potentially regenerate forests and mitigate carbon at low cost. The research was supported by a 2015 Walbridge Fund Graduate Award from the Princeton Environmental Institute.

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