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Environmental Conservation

Swamp microbe has pollution-munching superpower

Publish Date: 
Thursday, April 12, 2018 - 11:45am

Researchers in the lab of PEI associated faculty Peter Jaffe, professor of civil and environmental engineering, discovered a bacterium in a New Jersey wetland that has the surprising ability to degrade pollutants without using oxygen. This could offer a more efficient method for treating toxins in sewage.

Historians to climate researchers: "Let's talk"

Publish Date: 
Monday, March 19, 2018 - 12:30pm

History can tell us a lot about environmental upheaval, according to Princeton history professor and PEI associated faculty John Haldon and alumnus Lee Mordechai. What is missing in today’s debate about climate change is using what we know about how past societies handled environmental stresses to help inform our own situation.

Saving our cities and ourselves: A Q&A with PEI's Ashley Dawson

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 9:00am

Eco-justice scholar and activist Ashley Dawson, PEI's 2017-18 Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities, spoke with PEI about his recent book, "Extreme Cities: The Peril and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate Change," the uncertain future of cities, and how we can save our largest and most imperiled communities.

Theory suggests root efficiency, independence drove global spread of flora

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 1:00pm

Researchers from Princeton University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences suggest that plants were able to spread worldwide thanks to root adaptations that allowed them to become more efficient and independent. As plant species spread from their nutrient-rich tropical origins, roots became thinner so they could more efficiently explore poor soils for nutrients, and they shed their reliance on symbiotic fungi. The researchers report that root diameter and reliance on fungi most consistently characterize the plant communities across entire biomes such as deserts, savannas and temperate forests.

Pride tops guilt as a motivator for environmental decisions

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 12:45pm

Princeton University research suggests that emphasizing the pride people will feel if they make environmentally conscious decisions is a better way to promote eco-friendly behavior than making people feel guilty for not living more sustainably nor taking steps to ameliorate climate change.

Peter and Rosemary Grant to receive BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, February 6, 2018 - 10:30am

Princeton ecologists Peter and Rosemary Grant will receive the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the category of ecology and conservation biology. The Grants were cited for "their profound contributions to our understanding of the mechanisms and processes by which evolution occurs in the wild."

The ecological costs of war in Africa

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 1:00pm

After years of examining conflict in Africa's protected areas, Princeton researchers Joshua Daskin and Robert Pringle report in the journal Nature that war has been a consistent factor in the decades-long decline of Africa's large mammals. But they also found that wildlife populations rarely collapsed to the point where recovery was impossible, meaning that even protected areas severely affected by conflict are promising candidates for conservation and rehabilitation.

Princeton, Stockholm University team up to explore ‘Earth in 2050’ global environment

Publish Date: 
Thursday, December 7, 2017 - 10:30am

Princeton University welcomed researchers from the Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University for “Earth in 2050: Boundaries, Obstacles and Opportunities,” which focused on key issues related to the global environment, including food security, urban infrastructure, biodiversity and conservation biology, human behavior, and water quality. The Nov. 12-14 conference was by the Princeton International Fund, the Princeton Environmental Institute and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment.

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