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Environmental Conservation

A passion for nature drives senior Zoe Sims' excellence in environmental studies

Publish Date: 
Monday, June 5, 2017 - 11:00am

Zoe Sims, who will receive her degree in ecology and evolutionary biology and a certificate in environmental studies on June 6, has distinguished herself as a scientist and a student during her time at Princeton. She is motivated by a love of the environment and overcoming the challenges of field work. She received the Environmental Studies Senior Thesis Prize at PEI Class Day on June 5 for her study on the effect of groundwater pollution on coral reefs in Bermuda.

Protecting nature, preserving humanity: A Q&A with Robert Pringle

Publish Date: 
Friday, June 2, 2017 - 9:45am

Robert Pringle, a Princeton University assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, advocates in a June 1 perspective piece in the journal Nature for a global effort to upgrade and enlarge protected areas. In this Q&A, Pringle discusses his article, the need to defend and shore up protected areas, and how, if we forsake our remaining wild places, we risk losing the foundations of a healthy planet and the links to other living things that make us human.

Nitrogen contained in coral provides evidence of human impact on the open ocean

Publish Date: 
Friday, May 19, 2017 - 10:30am

“Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is, perhaps, substantially less severe than has been argued,” said PEI affiliated faculty, Daniel Sigman. In other words, the results of this study suggest that atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the open ocean “is not the problem we may need to worry the most about,” he said. 

PEI Faculty Seminar Series: Environmental Martyrdom and Defenders of the Forest

Spring 2017 PEI Faculty Seminar Series - 3/7/2017

Robert Nixon, Thomas A. and Currie C. Barron Family Professor in Humanities and the Environment. Professor of English and the Princeton Environmental Institute.

RESEARCH HONOR: Coverdale receives ESA Graduate Student Policy Award

Publish Date: 
Monday, April 3, 2017 - 3:00pm

Tyler Coverdale, a graduate student in Princeton University's Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, was one of six graduate students nationwide to receive a Graduate Student Policy Award from The Ecological Society of America. Recipients will travel to Washington, D.C., to meet with policymakers and discuss the importance of federal funding for the biological and ecological sciences.

Global Perspectives on Environmental Justice Event Series

Publish Date: 
Friday, March 3, 2017 - 10:00am

Global Perspectives on Environmental Justice

In spring 2017, PEI is launching Global Perspectives on Environmental Justice. This event series will feature writers, filmmakers, other visual artists, and scholars whose work engages fundamental questions of environmental justice. Our visitors will address the political, imaginative and ethical challenges that result from unequal exposure to environmental risk and unequal access to environmental resources.

Will It Rain? Monitoring Program Puts Crucial Info in Hands of Remotest Farmers

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, January 31, 2017 - 2:00pm

At a vegetable farm in West Africa, where the planting is done by hand, questions about weather boil down to the most urgent question of all:  Will the rains be good or bad?

Tree-Bark Thickness Indicates Fire-Resistance in a Hotter Future

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 10:15am

A new study has found that trees worldwide develop thicker bark when they live in fire-prone areas. The findings suggest that bark thickness could help predict which forests and savannas will survive a warmer climate in which wildfires are expected to increase in frequency.

Wild science: Photos from the Mpala Research Centre

For Princeton University faculty and students, the Mpala Research Centre, a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional field laboratory that sits on a 50,000-acre reserve and ranch in central Kenya, provides an expansive natural terrain ideal for large-scale field experiments in ecology, biology, geology and other fields. Students and other researchers at Mpala work in a setting where the human and natural worlds intersect, one of great natural beauty and diversity.

Wild Science: The Nature of the Mpala Research Centre

Publish Date: 
Friday, December 2, 2016 - 3:45pm

NANYUKI, Kenya — Princeton University graduate student Tyler Coverdale and Ryan O'Connell of the Class of 2017 clap as they walk around the tall bushes surrounding the sprawling experiment site. Not in applause, or for self-motivation — but to alert any buffalo, elephants or other animals that might be foraging for food or seeking shade from the intense equatorial sun.

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