Princeton University Logo    User Account

You are here

Environmental Biology

Study: Cold Climates and Ocean Carbon Sequestration

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 2:30pm

We know a lot about how carbon dioxide (CO2) levels can drive climate change, but how about the way that climate change can cause fluctuations in CO2 levels? New research from an international team of scientists reveals one of the mechanisms by which a colder climate was accompanied by depleted atmospheric CO2 during past ice ages.

The overall goal of the work is to better understand how and why the earth goes through periodic climate change, which could shed light on how man-made factors could affect the global climate.

How Temperature Guides Where Species Live and Where They'll Go

Publish Date: 
Thursday, February 16, 2017 - 11:30am

For decades, among the most enduring questions for ecologists have been: "Why do species live where they do? And what are the factors that keep them there?" A Princeton University-based study featured on the February cover of the journal Ecology could prove significant in answering that question, particularly for animals in the world's temperate mountain areas.

In African 'Fairy Circles,' a Template for Nature's Many Patterns

Publish Date: 
Thursday, January 19, 2017 - 4:00pm

Be it the Mima mounds of Washington state or the famous "fairy circles" of Namibia in southwestern Africa, people are captivated by the regular patterns of plant growth that blanket desert and grassland landscapes, often with mesmerizing consistency.

Tree-Bark Thickness Indicates Fire-Resistance in a Hotter Future

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 10:15am

A new study has found that trees worldwide develop thicker bark when they live in fire-prone areas. The findings suggest that bark thickness could help predict which forests and savannas will survive a warmer climate in which wildfires are expected to increase in frequency.

Wild science: Photos from the Mpala Research Centre

For Princeton University faculty and students, the Mpala Research Centre, a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional field laboratory that sits on a 50,000-acre reserve and ranch in central Kenya, provides an expansive natural terrain ideal for large-scale field experiments in ecology, biology, geology and other fields. Students and other researchers at Mpala work in a setting where the human and natural worlds intersect, one of great natural beauty and diversity.

Wild Science: The Nature of the Mpala Research Centre

Publish Date: 
Friday, December 2, 2016 - 3:45pm

NANYUKI, Kenya — Princeton University graduate student Tyler Coverdale and Ryan O'Connell of the Class of 2017 clap as they walk around the tall bushes surrounding the sprawling experiment site. Not in applause, or for self-motivation — but to alert any buffalo, elephants or other animals that might be foraging for food or seeking shade from the intense equatorial sun.

PEI Faculty Seminar Series Video: Competition, Hydraulic Damage, and the Universal Rules Regulating Plant Water Use

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 2:30pm

PEI Faculty Seminar Series Video: The Bonds We Make and the Bonds We Break; A Chemist’s View of How Metals Drive Biology

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, April 5, 2016 - 2:15pm

When Corals Met Algae: Symbiotic Relationship Crucial to Reef Survival Dates to the Triassic

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, November 2, 2016 - 2:30pm

The mutually beneficial relationship between algae and modern corals — which provides algae with shelter, gives coral reefs their colors and supplies both organisms with nutrients — began more than 210 million years ago, according to a new study by an international team of scientists including researchers from Princeton University.

Pages