Princeton University Logo    User Account

You are here

Environmental Biology

The ecological costs of war in Africa

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 1:00pm

After years of examining conflict in Africa's protected areas, Princeton researchers Joshua Daskin and Robert Pringle report in the journal Nature that war has been a consistent factor in the decades-long decline of Africa's large mammals. But they also found that wildlife populations rarely collapsed to the point where recovery was impossible, meaning that even protected areas severely affected by conflict are promising candidates for conservation and rehabilitation.

Study of Darwin’s finches reveals that new species can develop in as little as two generations

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 1:45pm

Princeton University researchers B. Rosemary Grant and Peter Grant, along with researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden, have found that a new species of Darwin’s finches developed in as little as two generations, which provides direct genetic evidence of a novel way in which new species arise. The Grants have been studying the evolution of Darwin’s finches on the small island of Daphne Major in the Galápagos Islands for the last four decades.

PEI Faculty Seminar Series: Ocean Acidification

Fall 2017 PEI Faculty Seminar Series - 11/7/2017

François M.M. Morel, Albert G. Blanke, Jr., Professor of Geosciences, professor of geosciences and the Princeton Environmental Institute

Room to grow: Princeton's Vertical Farming Project

Princeton University’s Vertical Farming Project was established as a model vertical farm — which involves growing food crops indoors on stacked shelves — to generate accessible and up-to-date research for the field.  Video by Nick Donnoli, Office of Communications.

Drones, Thorns and New Orleans: PEI's Summer of Learning Symposium features breadth of undergrad research

Publish Date: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 9:15am

Drones in Africa, algal biofuel and the necessity of thorns. These topics and more constituted the varied research projects of 88 Princeton University undergraduates who presented the results of their summer-long internships during the Princeton Environmental Institute's 2017 Summer of Learning Symposium Oct. 6 at the Campus Club.

Room for Growth: Princeton's Vertical Farming Project harvests knowledge for a budding industry

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 9:00am

Princeton researchers and students launched the Princeton Vertical Farming Project in April as an open-source model for optimizing vertical farming, which involves growing produce indoors on stacked shelves. Increasingly popular and touted for its limited use of land, chemicals and water, vertical farming suffers from a lack of up-to-date and publicly available data that those involved in the Princeton project hope to provide.

To Predict How Climate Change Will Affect Disease, Researchers Must Fuse Climate Science and Biology

Publish Date: 
Monday, September 18, 2017 - 11:00am

Predicting how climate change will affect the incidence of infectious diseases is made difficult by the complex relationship between climate and disease. In a recent review paper, PEI associated faculty Jessica Metcalf, a Princeton assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and public affairs, and coauthors write that researchers need new statistical models that incorporate both climate factors and the climate-disease relationship, and account for uncertainties in both.

Orange is the New Green: How Orange Peels Revived a Costa Rican Forest

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 10:00am

A team led by Princeton University researchers — including David Wilcove, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and public affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute — found that a barren pasture in a Costa Rican national park became a lush forest 16 years after an orange juice company unloaded 1,000 truckloads of orange peels and orange pulp onto it. The researchers report in the journal Restoration Ecology a 176 percent increase in aboveground biomass within the 3-hectare (7-acre) area studied, which demonstrates the power of agricultural waste to potentially regenerate forests and mitigate carbon at low cost. The research was supported by a 2015 Walbridge Fund Graduate Award from the Princeton Environmental Institute.

Peter and Rosemary Grant receive Royal Medal in Biology

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, July 18, 2017 - 9:30am

Peter Grant, the Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology, Emeritus, and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, emeritus, and B. Rosemary Grant, senior research biologist, emeritus, ecology and evolutionary biology, have been named recipients of the Royal Medal in Biology.

Pages