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Environmental Biology

Stoddard receives Packard Fellowship for early-career scientists

Publish Date: 
Monday, October 15, 2018 - 1:15pm

Mary Caswell "Cassie" Stoddard, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and PEI associated faculty, was one of 18 researchers nationwide to receive a David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering, which is awarded to innovative, early-career scientists and engineers. Recipients also include William Anderegg, an assistant professor of biology at the University of Utah and a past PEI postdoctoral research associate.

Princeton Profiles: Zoe Sims, finding purpose and passion in the natural world

Publish Date: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 12:30pm

After graduating from Princeton, Zoe Sims '17, who received her degree in EEB with a certificate in ENV, spent a year in service at the Mpala Research Centre in Kenya through a Princeton in Africa fellowship. Sims distinguished herself as a scientist and a student while at Princeton – including receiving numerous honors from PEI — and she continues to pursue her passion for the environment.

Photosynthesis and engines evolved in remarkably similar ways

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, July 25, 2018 - 11:00am

A study from the group of Amilcare Porporato, the Thomas J. Wu ’94 Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Princeton Environmental Institute, suggests that plants and internal combustion engines share striking parallels in adapting to changing environmental conditions. The study suggests that people could more consciously take lessons from nature when designing mechanical systems.

Protecting corn, saving elephants: Alana Reynolds pursues conservation through conflict resolution

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, May 30, 2018 - 1:00pm

Princeton University senior Alana Reynolds' lifelong passion for the environment is rooted in the desire to help resolve human-wildlife conflict. Reynolds, who will graduate in June with a degree in ecology and evolutionary biology and a certificate in environmental studies, traveled to Mozambique in 2017 with support from the Becky Colvin Memorial Award to conduct fieldwork for her senior thesis on the effectiveness of various types of fences that subsistence farmers on the border of Gorongosa National Park could use to protect their crops from elephants.

Swamp microbe has pollution-munching superpower

Publish Date: 
Thursday, April 12, 2018 - 11:45am

Researchers in the lab of PEI associated faculty Peter Jaffe, professor of civil and environmental engineering, discovered a bacterium in a New Jersey wetland that has the surprising ability to degrade pollutants without using oxygen. This could offer a more efficient method for treating toxins in sewage.

Lessons from lemurs: To make friends, show off your smarts

Publish Date: 
Monday, April 9, 2018 - 8:00am

A study of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) suggests that a clever individual's social position can improve if others see their problem-solving skills pay off, according to a team of Princeton University researchers, including PEI associated faculty Dan Rubenstein, Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and director of the Program in Environmental Studies.

As antibiotics fail, global consumption of antibiotics skyrockets, further driving drug resistance

Publish Date: 
Monday, March 26, 2018 - 3:00pm

The worldwide use of antibiotics in humans soared 39 percent between 2000 and 2015, fueled by dramatic increases in low-income and middle-income countries, according to a study involving Princeton and PEI researchers. The study, which analyzed human antibiotic consumption in 76 countries, is the most comprehensive assessment of global trends to date.

ChESS Series: "Resolving Host-Microbe Conflict," with Toby Kiers

Toby Kiers, University Research Chair and professor of evolutionary biology at the University of Amsterdam, presented, "Resolving Host-Microbe Conflict," at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15, in Guyot Hall, Room 10.

Theory suggests root efficiency, independence drove global spread of flora

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 1:00pm

Researchers from Princeton University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences suggest that plants were able to spread worldwide thanks to root adaptations that allowed them to become more efficient and independent. As plant species spread from their nutrient-rich tropical origins, roots became thinner so they could more efficiently explore poor soils for nutrients, and they shed their reliance on symbiotic fungi. The researchers report that root diameter and reliance on fungi most consistently characterize the plant communities across entire biomes such as deserts, savannas and temperate forests.

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