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Environmental Biology

Swamp microbe has pollution-munching superpower

Publish Date: 
Thursday, April 12, 2018 - 11:45am

Researchers in the lab of PEI associated faculty Peter Jaffe, professor of civil and environmental engineering, discovered a bacterium in a New Jersey wetland that has the surprising ability to degrade pollutants without using oxygen. This could offer a more efficient method for treating toxins in sewage.

Lessons from lemurs: To make friends, show off your smarts

Publish Date: 
Monday, April 9, 2018 - 8:00am

A study of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) suggests that a clever individual's social position can improve if others see their problem-solving skills pay off, according to a team of Princeton University researchers, including PEI associated faculty Dan Rubenstein, Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and director of the Program in Environmental Studies.

As antibiotics fail, global consumption of antibiotics skyrockets, further driving drug resistance

Publish Date: 
Monday, March 26, 2018 - 3:00pm

The worldwide use of antibiotics in humans soared 39 percent between 2000 and 2015, fueled by dramatic increases in low-income and middle-income countries, according to a study involving Princeton and PEI researchers. The study, which analyzed human antibiotic consumption in 76 countries, is the most comprehensive assessment of global trends to date.

ChESS Series: "Resolving Host-Microbe Conflict," with Toby Kiers

Toby Kiers, University Research Chair and professor of evolutionary biology at the University of Amsterdam, presented, "Resolving Host-Microbe Conflict," at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15, in Guyot Hall, Room 10.

Theory suggests root efficiency, independence drove global spread of flora

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 1:00pm

Researchers from Princeton University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences suggest that plants were able to spread worldwide thanks to root adaptations that allowed them to become more efficient and independent. As plant species spread from their nutrient-rich tropical origins, roots became thinner so they could more efficiently explore poor soils for nutrients, and they shed their reliance on symbiotic fungi. The researchers report that root diameter and reliance on fungi most consistently characterize the plant communities across entire biomes such as deserts, savannas and temperate forests.

Stoddard named 2018 Sloan Research Fellow

Publish Date: 
Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 11:15am

Mary Caswell Stoddard, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and PEI associated faculty, was among two Princeton University faculty members to be named a 2018 Sloan Research Fellow, along with 126 researchers from 53 colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. Awarded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the $65,000 grants recognize outstanding scientists and scholars early in their careers. Recipients can use the grants as they wish to further their research.

Competing for blood: How ecologists are solving infectious disease mysteries

Publish Date: 
Monday, February 12, 2018 - 1:45pm

Princeton ecologists Andrea Graham, an associate professor of ecology and environmental biologist and PEI associated faculty, and Sarah Budischak examined data from an Indonesian study of 4,000 patients who were "co-infected" with malaria and hookworm. Their ecological perspective proved vital to realizing that the co-infecting species are fighting over a shared resource: red blood cells.

Peter and Rosemary Grant to receive BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, February 6, 2018 - 10:30am

Princeton ecologists Peter and Rosemary Grant will receive the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the category of ecology and conservation biology. The Grants were cited for "their profound contributions to our understanding of the mechanisms and processes by which evolution occurs in the wild."

The ecological costs of war in Africa

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 1:00pm

After years of examining conflict in Africa's protected areas, Princeton researchers Joshua Daskin and Robert Pringle report in the journal Nature that war has been a consistent factor in the decades-long decline of Africa's large mammals. But they also found that wildlife populations rarely collapsed to the point where recovery was impossible, meaning that even protected areas severely affected by conflict are promising candidates for conservation and rehabilitation.

Study of Darwin’s finches reveals that new species can develop in as little as two generations

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 1:45pm

Princeton University researchers B. Rosemary Grant and Peter Grant, along with researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden, have found that a new species of Darwin’s finches developed in as little as two generations, which provides direct genetic evidence of a novel way in which new species arise. The Grants have been studying the evolution of Darwin’s finches on the small island of Daphne Major in the Galápagos Islands for the last four decades.

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