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Carbon Mitigation

PEI awards $515,000 to projects studying our changing climate and environment

Publish Date: 
Monday, April 23, 2018 - 4:45pm

Birds and flowers out of sync, the integration of built and natural flood-control features, and frozen methane deep beneath the ocean are among the five projects recently funded by the Princeton Environmental Institute as part of its Climate and Energy Challenge program. Totaling $515,000, the newly awarded research projects will run from 2018 to 2020.

Bourg receives NSF CAREER grant to study fine-grain soil hydrology, mechanics

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, March 13, 2018 - 10:00am

Ian Bourg, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Princeton Environmental Institute, has received a five-year CAREER award from the National Science Foundation to study the hydrology and mechanics of fine-grained soils and sedimentary rocks.

Princeton climate scientist Balaji selected for French climate initiative

Publish Date: 
Thursday, January 11, 2018 - 10:30am

PEI associated faculty Venkatramani Balaji is one of 18 scientists worldwide selected to receive funding from the prestigious "Make Our Planet Great Again" climate initiative launched by French President Emmanuel Macron.

Drones, Thorns and New Orleans: PEI's Summer of Learning Symposium features breadth of undergrad research

Publish Date: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 9:15am

Drones in Africa, algal biofuel and the necessity of thorns. These topics and more constituted the varied research projects of 88 Princeton University undergraduates who presented the results of their summer-long internships during the Princeton Environmental Institute's 2017 Summer of Learning Symposium Oct. 6 at the Campus Club.

Leaks will not sink carbon capture and storage

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - 9:00am

The case for carbon capture and storage — a promising method for reducing greenhouse gases — received a boost recently from a Princeton study that indicated the procedure would not be prone to significant leakage or high costs related to fixing leaks. Authors of the study included PEI associated faculty Catherine Peters, professor and chair of civil and environmental engineering, and Michael Oppenheimer, the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute

Orange is the New Green: How Orange Peels Revived a Costa Rican Forest

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 10:00am

A team led by Princeton University researchers — including David Wilcove, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and public affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute — found that a barren pasture in a Costa Rican national park became a lush forest 16 years after an orange juice company unloaded 1,000 truckloads of orange peels and orange pulp onto it. The researchers report in the journal Restoration Ecology a 176 percent increase in aboveground biomass within the 3-hectare (7-acre) area studied, which demonstrates the power of agricultural waste to potentially regenerate forests and mitigate carbon at low cost. The research was supported by a 2015 Walbridge Fund Graduate Award from the Princeton Environmental Institute.

Analysis shows carbon-slashing promise of new biofuel technology

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, July 12, 2017 - 10:00am

Finding an alternative vehicle fuel poses a difficult challenge: it has to be relatively cheap and able to reduce carbon emissions without using up valuable crop land or trees from forests.

Now, researchers at Princeton’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment say one possible solution might be all around us. In a recent paper, the researchers evaluated a method that creates fuel from wood residues, sawdust and branches. The method, called catalytic hydropyrolysis, could use the refining and distribution systems now used for gasoline to create a fuel that would work in modern engines.

Nitrogen contained in coral provides evidence of human impact on the open ocean

Publish Date: 
Friday, May 19, 2017 - 10:30am

“Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is, perhaps, substantially less severe than has been argued,” said PEI affiliated faculty, Daniel Sigman. In other words, the results of this study suggest that atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the open ocean “is not the problem we may need to worry the most about,” he said. 

Baker, 61st U.S. Secretary of State, calls for conservative action on looming climate crisis

Publish Date: 
Friday, May 12, 2017 - 9:30am

James A. Baker III, a 1952 graduate of Princeton, former University trustee, and the 61st U.S. Secretary of State, presented his speech, "A Conservative Approach to Climate Change," to a full audience in Princeton University's McCosh Hall on May 10. Baker, the honoree of PEI's 2017 Taplin Environmental Lecture, has developed a plan with several prominent Republicans to garner conservative support for curbing carbon emissions and curtailing the effects of climate change.

Synthetic Gas Would Cut Air Pollution but Worsen Climate Damage in China

Publish Date: 
Monday, May 1, 2017 - 8:45am

Severe air pollution has plagued China's industrial regions in recent decades, a situation that has received worldwide attention thanks to photos of Beijing and other smog-blanketed Chinese cities. 

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