Princeton University Logo    User Account

You are here

Carbon Capture and Sequestration

Funded by new tax credits, U.S. carbon-capture network could double global CO2 headed underground

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 9:30am

Princeton University researchers have proposed a U.S. pipeline network that would capture, transport and store underground up to 30 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year — an amount equal to removing 6.5 million cars from the road. The authors found that the network infrastructure would only be possible if tax credits passed by Congress in 2018 to encourage investment in carbon capture-and-storage technology are coupled with low-interest government financing.

Bourg receives NSF CAREER grant to study fine-grain soil hydrology, mechanics

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, March 13, 2018 - 10:00am

Ian Bourg, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Princeton Environmental Institute, has received a five-year CAREER award from the National Science Foundation to study the hydrology and mechanics of fine-grained soils and sedimentary rocks.

Leaks will not sink carbon capture and storage

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - 9:00am

The case for carbon capture and storage — a promising method for reducing greenhouse gases — received a boost recently from a Princeton study that indicated the procedure would not be prone to significant leakage or high costs related to fixing leaks. Authors of the study included PEI associated faculty Catherine Peters, professor and chair of civil and environmental engineering, and Michael Oppenheimer, the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute

Orange is the New Green: How Orange Peels Revived a Costa Rican Forest

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 10:00am

A team led by Princeton University researchers — including David Wilcove, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and public affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute — found that a barren pasture in a Costa Rican national park became a lush forest 16 years after an orange juice company unloaded 1,000 truckloads of orange peels and orange pulp onto it. The researchers report in the journal Restoration Ecology a 176 percent increase in aboveground biomass within the 3-hectare (7-acre) area studied, which demonstrates the power of agricultural waste to potentially regenerate forests and mitigate carbon at low cost. The research was supported by a 2015 Walbridge Fund Graduate Award from the Princeton Environmental Institute.

Analysis shows carbon-slashing promise of new biofuel technology

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, July 12, 2017 - 10:00am

Finding an alternative vehicle fuel poses a difficult challenge: it has to be relatively cheap and able to reduce carbon emissions without using up valuable crop land or trees from forests.

Now, researchers at Princeton’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment say one possible solution might be all around us. In a recent paper, the researchers evaluated a method that creates fuel from wood residues, sawdust and branches. The method, called catalytic hydropyrolysis, could use the refining and distribution systems now used for gasoline to create a fuel that would work in modern engines.

Study: Cold Climates and Ocean Carbon Sequestration

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 2:30pm

We know a lot about how carbon dioxide (CO2) levels can drive climate change, but how about the way that climate change can cause fluctuations in CO2 levels? New research from an international team of scientists reveals one of the mechanisms by which a colder climate was accompanied by depleted atmospheric CO2 during past ice ages.

The overall goal of the work is to better understand how and why the earth goes through periodic climate change, which could shed light on how man-made factors could affect the global climate.

PEI Faculty Seminar Series Video: Competition, Hydraulic Damage, and the Universal Rules Regulating Plant Water Use

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 2:30pm

PEI Faculty Seminar Series Video: CO2 Sequestration in Conventional and Unconventional Reservoirs

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 10:15am

Michael Celia, Theodora Shelton Pitney Professor of Environmental Studies. Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Director, Program in Environmental Engineering and Water Resources.

Interactions Between Climate and Regional Air Quality in the U.S.

Interactions Between Climate and Regional Air Quality in the U.S.: How Changing Climate May Affect Smog and How Cleaning Up Smog May Affect Climate
Loretta J. Mickley  - Senior Research Fellow, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University

Pages