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Habits and history determine if conservation succeeds or fails

Publish Date: 
Thursday, December 20, 2018 - 11:15am

Researchers at Rutgers and Princeton universities found that conservation succeeds or fails based on past habits and decisions related to that resource. Patterns of overexploitation can be broken, however, by quickly implemented harvest-reduction campaigns that have spurred long-term conservation practices.

Princeton Profiles: Zoe Sims, finding purpose and passion in the natural world

Publish Date: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 12:30pm

After graduating from Princeton, Zoe Sims '17, who received her degree in EEB with a certificate in ENV, spent a year in service at the Mpala Research Centre in Kenya through a Princeton in Africa fellowship. Sims distinguished herself as a scientist and a student while at Princeton – including receiving numerous honors from PEI — and she continues to pursue her passion for the environment.

Diving robots find that Antarctic seas release surprising amounts of carbon dioxide in winter

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, August 14, 2018 - 12:00pm

The Southern Ocean surrounding Antarctica — regarded by scientists as a large and crucial absorber of atmospheric carbon dioxide — may in fact release significantly more carbon dioxide than previously thought during the winter, according to a study from the Princeton University-based Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) project administered by PEI. The study is based on data from autonomous floats deployed by SOCCOM that captured the first comprehensive data about the Southern Ocean during the treacherous Antarctic winter.

Foam could offer greener option for petroleum drillers

Publish Date: 
Thursday, August 9, 2018 - 11:00am

Princeton researchers have experimentally tested the fracturing behavior of foam for use in hydraulic fracturing, which would use about 90 percent less water than fracking fluids, but the mechanism for foam-driven fracture is not well understood. The research was supported by PEI's Mary and Randall Hack ’69 Graduate Fund and Carbon Mitigation Initiative and led by PEI associated faculty Howard Stone, the Donald R. Dixon '69 and Elizabeth W. Dixon Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

Lessons from lemurs: To make friends, show off your smarts

Publish Date: 
Monday, April 9, 2018 - 8:00am

A study of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) suggests that a clever individual's social position can improve if others see their problem-solving skills pay off, according to a team of Princeton University researchers, including PEI associated faculty Dan Rubenstein, Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and director of the Program in Environmental Studies.

As antibiotics fail, global consumption of antibiotics skyrockets, further driving drug resistance

Publish Date: 
Monday, March 26, 2018 - 3:00pm

The worldwide use of antibiotics in humans soared 39 percent between 2000 and 2015, fueled by dramatic increases in low-income and middle-income countries, according to a study involving Princeton and PEI researchers. The study, which analyzed human antibiotic consumption in 76 countries, is the most comprehensive assessment of global trends to date.

Historians to climate researchers: "Let's talk"

Publish Date: 
Monday, March 19, 2018 - 12:30pm

History can tell us a lot about environmental upheaval, according to Princeton history professor and PEI associated faculty John Haldon and alumnus Lee Mordechai. What is missing in today’s debate about climate change is using what we know about how past societies handled environmental stresses to help inform our own situation.

Predicting snowpack in the West before the first flake falls

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 9:00am

New Princeton-NOAA research suggests that annual snowmelt in the American West can be predicted to the scale of a mountain range as early as March — some eight months before winter begins. The research has the potential to improve water-related decisions for numerous sectors, including agriculture, tourism and fire-control.

The ecological costs of war in Africa

Publish Date: 
Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 1:00pm

After years of examining conflict in Africa's protected areas, Princeton researchers Joshua Daskin and Robert Pringle report in the journal Nature that war has been a consistent factor in the decades-long decline of Africa's large mammals. But they also found that wildlife populations rarely collapsed to the point where recovery was impossible, meaning that even protected areas severely affected by conflict are promising candidates for conservation and rehabilitation.

Leaks will not sink carbon capture and storage

Publish Date: 
Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - 9:00am

The case for carbon capture and storage — a promising method for reducing greenhouse gases — received a boost recently from a Princeton study that indicated the procedure would not be prone to significant leakage or high costs related to fixing leaks. Authors of the study included PEI associated faculty Catherine Peters, professor and chair of civil and environmental engineering, and Michael Oppenheimer, the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute

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