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Posted by Morgan Kelly Office of Communications on Jan 19, 2017
Scientists from Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have produced the first global analysis of how climate change may affect the frequency and location of mild-weather days — and it may be soon. In a report published Jan. 18 in the journal...
 
 
Posted by Matt Soniak for the Office of Engineering Communications on Jan 13, 2017
In August 2015, a dust storm blanketed large areas of seven Middle East nations in a haze of dust and sand thick enough to obscure them from satellite view. The storm led to several deaths, thousands of cases of respiratory ailments and injuries, and canceled airline flights and closed ports....
 
 
Posted by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research on Jan 11, 2017
A new study has found that trees worldwide develop thicker bark when they live in fire-prone areas. The findings suggest that bark thickness could help predict which forests and savannas will survive a warmer climate in which wildfires are expected to increase in frequency. Trees in regions...
 
 
Posted by Igor Heifetz on Jan 06, 2017
This essay by Melissa Lane forms part of a series within the work programme of the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity, investigating the philosophical understandings of sustainable prosperity. Whose job is it to save the planet? Apart from a very few people—the director of...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications on Jan 04, 2017
The government of a low-lying island nation is considering the construction of a seawall to protect its capital and economic hub from the rising seas brought on by climate change. The length and expense of the project depends on how high the wall needs to be — 3 feet? Four? A wall that's too...
 
 
Posted by B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School on Dec 19, 2016
Responding to the challenges of climate change depends both on scientific assessment as well as value judgments by citizens, academics and policymakers. To explain the interconnectivity of science and value judgments, Princeton University’s Climate Futures Initiative (CFI) has...
 
 
Posted by Igor Heifetz on Dec 19, 2016
Major: Anthropology Professional role and organization: Project 55 Fellow and Charles Evans Future Conservation Leader at D&R Greenway Land Trust How do you define sustainability? The term sustainability is used extensively with a seeming variety of meanings, but to me sustainability...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications on Dec 02, 2016
NANYUKI, Kenya — Princeton University graduate student Tyler Coverdale and Ryan O'Connell of the Class of 2017 clap as they walk around the tall bushes surrounding the sprawling experiment site. Not in applause, or for self-motivation — but to alert any buffalo, elephants or other animals that...
 
 
Posted by Robert Socolow on Nov 22, 2016
The Trump administration may well continue to trash climate science in the months ahead, thereby damaging science, the reputation of the United States, and the planet. Nonpartisan alliances, in which scientists join tough-minded captains of industry, military officers, and others, could provide the...
 
 
Posted by Holly Welles on Nov 17, 2016
Article in Nature describes efforts by Jorge Sarmiento and collaborators to gather the first real-time data on the chemical and biological processes that govern carbon in the Southern Ocean.
 
 
Posted by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications on Nov 17, 2016
Across the United States, abandoned oil and gas wells are a significant source of greenhouse gases, particularly methane. Yet there are so many scattered across the country that stopping the leaks — and even determining which wells are leaking — presents an enormous challenge. Now, scientists...
 
 
Posted by Igor Heifetz on Nov 15, 2016
Improving coastal resiliency, and the adoption of natural infrastructure as part of a multiple lines of defense strategy, relies on effective coastal flood hazards and risk assessment and risk management. Current flood hazards maps do not adequately consider geomorphological, physical and...
 
 
Posted by Igor Heifetz on Nov 15, 2016
Peter Singer, Ira W. Decamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human Values Most of us accept that suffering is an intrinsically bad thing, even if it may sometimes lead to good consequences. That judgment is, I suspect, much more widely accepted than the judgment that...
 
 
Posted by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research on Nov 02, 2016
The mutually beneficial relationship between algae and modern corals — which provides algae with shelter, gives coral reefs their colors and supplies both organisms with nutrients — began more than 210 million years ago, according to a new study by an international team of scientists including...
 
 
Posted by Igor Heifetz on Oct 31, 2016
MUMBAI, India — About 300 million children in the world breathe highly toxic air, the United Nations Children’s Fund said in a report on Monday that used satellite imagery to illustrate the magnitude of the problem. The vast majority of these children, about 220 million, live in South Asia, in...
 
 
Posted by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications on Oct 20, 2016
NANYUKI, Kenya — The small airplane bobbed and tilted in the midday heat rising off the Kenyan bushland as it quickly dropped onto the short red-dirt airstrip. Zebras grazed in the runway's grassy margins alongside gazelles and hulking, spear-horned oryx. Elephants milled about the dense trees and...
 
 
Posted by Igor Heifetz on Oct 11, 2016
Tiny valves on the surfaces of leaves, called stomates, regulate carbon gain and water loss by plants, and are thus linchpins of the global carbon and water cycles. Amazingly, the same simple model regulates stomates worldwide. This model is backed by enormous empirical data and a 40-year-old...
 
 
Posted by Chris Emery for the Office of Engineering Communications on Oct 10, 2016
In the wake of historic destruction wrought by Hurricane Sandy in 2012, residents of New York and other coastal cities were left wondering whether Sandy-scale storm floods are the new normal.  Now, researchers from Princeton and Rutgers universities and the Woods Hole Oceanographic...
 
 
Posted by Danielle Alio, Office of Communications on Oct 07, 2016
When Ben Sorkin put on his racing suit and helmet, he knew the moment he waited over two years for had finally come. His teammates helped strap him into the driver's seat. For the first time, he would be energizing their electric car for its very first run around a race track. Sorkin, a ...
 
 
Posted by Holly Welles on Oct 06, 2016
Last Friday, September 30th, eighty-four (84) Princeton undergraduates gathered at the Campus Club to present findings from their summer 2016 internships and service experiences. This Summer of Learning Symposium provides students the opportunity to present their research findings on...