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Posted by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications on Sep 23, 2016
Princeton University researchers have compiled 30 years of data to construct the first ice core-based record of atmospheric oxygen concentrations spanning the past 800,000 years, according to a paper published today in the journalScience. The record shows that atmospheric oxygen has declined 0.7 percent relative to current atmospheric-oxygen concentrations, a reasonable pace by geological standards, the researchers said. During the past 100 years, however, atmospheric oxygen has declined by a comparatively speedy 0.1 percent because of the burning of fossil fuels, which consumes...
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Posted by Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications, and B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs on Sep 21, 2016
Issues related to the environment and climate change will demand the new president's attention soon after he or she takes office Jan. 20 and throughout the next four years. In the second part of a Q&A series on challenges that will face the new president, Princeton University researchers Rob Nixon, Michael Oppenheimer and David Wilcove examine environmental and climate-change issues. Nixon is the Thomas A. and Currie C. Barron Family Professor in the Humanities and the Environment and a professor of Englishand the Princeton Environmental...
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Posted by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications on Sep 15, 2016
NANYUKI, Kenya — For 30 long minutes, the two safari buses trundled across the dry bushland of northern Kenya. Rocks and a haze of red dust kicked up from the rough and pitted road. The sun seared through the cloudless sky and thin air of the high escarpment, illuminating the leaves and long blanched thorns of the acacia trees. The roughly 40 people in the buses snapped photos of giraffes languidly plucking treetops clean, or of small families of elephants crushing and eating the dense and brittle vegetation mere feet from the road. But a specific animal had brought these people out in the...
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Posted by Joanna M. Foster ’08 for the Princeton Environmental Institute on Sep 09, 2016
The Princeton Environmental Institute has awarded a $433,500 to support three additional research projects as part of the Climate and Energy Challenge. Climate and Energy Challenge research projects tackle challenges in climate dynamics, the impacts of global change on the Earth's ecosystems, alternative energy, and energy efficiency. Funded projects involve faculty from numerous departments across campus. The Climate and Energy Challenge is one of several long-term research and teaching cooperatives supported by PEI as part of the Grand Challenges program – a campus-wide initiative...
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Posted by B. Rose Kelly on Sep 07, 2016
After years of environmental destruction, China has spent billions of dollars on the world's largest reforestation program, converting a combined area nearly the size of New York and Pennsylvania back to forest. The government-backed effort, known as the Grain-for-Green Program, has transformed 28 million hectares (69.2 million acres) of cropland and barren scrubland back to forest in an effort to prevent erosion and alleviate rural poverty. While researchers around the world have studied the program, little attention has been paid to understanding how the program has affected...
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Posted by Holly Welles on Sep 02, 2016
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) is pleased to announce that Alan C. Braddock has been co-appointed by PEI and the Department of Art and Archaeology as the 2016 Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities. Braddock is the Ralph H. Wark Associate Professor of Art History and American Studies at the College of William and Mary. His research and teaching focus on the history of American art, ecology, and animal studies.  He is the author of the book Thomas Eakins and the Cultures of Modernity (2009) and co-editor, with Christoph...
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Posted by Melissa Policicchio for the Princeton Environmental Institute on Aug 31, 2016
In 1941, Albert Alexander, an off-duty Oxford policeman, became the first critically ill patient to receive antibiotic treatment, starting a global trend of antibiotics being used for everything from treating infection to promoting agriculture. Enthusiastic and untampered use has come at a cost, however, and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) now threatens the global community. Bacteria and other microorganisms are evolving to fight back, resisting the antibiotics meant to fight infection and waging a microscopic war with catastrophic consequences. Dr. Ramanan Laxminarayan, director of the...
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Posted by Joanna M. Foster ’08 for the Princeton Environmental Institute on Aug 29, 2016
Four graduate students have been awarded 2016 PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellowships by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI). The recipients are: Alexander Berg from electrical engineering, Michelle Frazer from atmospheric and oceanic sciences, and Da Pan and Siyuan Xian from civil and environmental engineering. Through the PEI-STEP Fellowship Program, Ph.D. students in departments outside of the Woodrow Wilson School receive funding for two years to enable them to explore the environmental policy dimensions and implications of their doctoral research through supplementary course...
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Posted by Joanna M. Foster ’08 for the Princeton Environmental Institute on Aug 29, 2016
Nine graduate students have been selected to join the Princeton Energy and Climate Scholars Program (PECS) for the 2016-2017 academic year. Representing seven diverse departments, the nine newly selected students will contribute a wide range of climate- and energy-related expertise to the existing group of PECS scholars. Their interests span an array of topics including environmental risk, urban climate change and inequality, dynamics of hydraulic fracturing, air pollution, sustainable building materials, atmospheric remediation and fuel source development, physics of combustion, art and...
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Posted by Chris Emery for the Office of Engineering Communications on Aug 25, 2016
Objective measurements of storm intensity show that North Atlantic hurricanes have grown more destructive in recent decades. But coastal residents' views on the matter depend less on scientific fact and more on their gender, belief in climate change and recent experience with hurricanes, according to a new study by researchers at Princeton University, Auburn University-Montgomery, the Louisiana State University and Texas A&M University. The researchers plumbed data from a survey of Gulf Coast residents and found that the severity of the most recent storm a person weathered tended to...
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